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tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Sun, 12th Oct '08 7:53 PM

ADD A NUMBER 4

Welcome to Add A Number 4

I have owned several Chevrolet GMC 1500 pickups, mostly Earnhardt Sr. Black, over the years.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 12th Oct '08 8:44 PM

In 1501, Michelangelo was given the official contract to complete statue of David. The 17 ft marble statue portrays the Biblical King David in the nude, at the moment that he decides to battle with Goliath. It came to symbolize the defense of civic liberties embodied in the Florentine Republic.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 6:13 AM

1502 - Christopher Columbus leaves Cadiz, Spain for his fourth and final trip to the "New World". He explores Central America, and discovers St. Lucia, the Isthmus of Panama, Honduras, and Costa Rica.

Portuguese explorers, led by Pedro Álvares Cabral, sail into Guanabara Bay, Brazil, mistaking it for the mouth of a river, which they name Rio de Janeiro.




tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 9:21 AM

Anno 1503, a.k.a 1503 A.D.: The New World, is a game with both real time strategy and city building elements, developed by the Austria-based Max Design company. It revolves around building and maintaining a 16th century colony in the New World.

pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 9:27 AM

February 29, 1504, Christopher Columbus uses his knowledge of a lunar eclipse that night to convince Jamaican tribesmen to provide him with supplies.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 1:41 PM

The first known lottery in France was created by King Francis I in or around 1505. After that first attempt, lotteries were forbidden for two centuries. They reappeared at the end of the 17th century, as a "public lottery" for the Paris municipality (called Loterie de L'Hotel de Ville) and as "private" ones for religious orders, mostly for nuns in convents.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 4:16 PM

In 1506 Christopher Columbus died in Valladolid, Spain fairly wealthy from the gold his men had accumulated in Hispaniola. When he died he was still convinced that his journeys had been along the east coast of Asia.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 5:09 PM

1507 - Martin Waldseemüller publishes his world map, naming the new continent America in honour of Amerigo Vespucci

Leonardo da Vinci completes the Mona Lisa.


smoke20
Smoke20  (Level: 62.6 - Posts: 2815)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 6:53 PM

1508 Kemi is an asteroid discovered in 1938 when it crossed in front of Mars.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 7:10 PM

Henry VIII became king of England in 1509.
He ruled for 38 years and remains one of the country's most famous and controversial kings.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 8:27 PM

The ship Mary Rose was launched in 1510. She was an English carrack and one of the first to be able to fire a full broadside of cannons, being well equipped with 78 guns. She was thought to be named after King Henry VIII's sister Mary and the rose, the Tudor emblem.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 13th Oct '08 9:00 PM

According to the 2000 census there were 1,511 housing units in Paw Paw Michigan. Paw Paw is named for the pawpaw trees which once grew along the Paw Paw River.

One famous native was "Paw Paw" Charlie Maxwell, a former Detroit Tigers baseball player who was also known as "Sunday" Charlie due to his propensity for hitting home runs during Sunday games

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 14th Oct '08 5:33 AM

1512 - The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, painted by Michelangelo Buonarroti, is exhibited to the public for the first time.
Copernicus writes Commentariolus, and moves the sun to the center of the solar system.
Amerigo Vespucci dies, Italian merchant and cartographer, discoverer of the New World (b. 1454)


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 14th Oct '08 10:58 AM

In 1513 Magellan is the first person recorded to set foot on the Micronesian Islands. He lands on Guam (located in the Mariana Islands) and meets the Chamorros there.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 14th Oct '08 11:02 AM

Hernando De Soto sailed to the New World in 1514 with the first Governor of Panama, Pedrarias Dávila. Brave leadership, unwavering loyalty, and clever schemes for the extortion of native villages for their captured chiefs became De Soto's hallmark during the Conquest of Central America. He gained fame as an excellent horseman, fighter, and tactician, but was notorious for the extreme brutality with which he wielded these gifts.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 14th Oct '08 5:46 PM

The first commercial hunting of seals is said to have occurred in 1515, when a cargo of fur seal skins from Uruguay was sent to Spain for sale in the markets of Seville.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 14th Oct '08 6:33 PM

The Royal Mail traces its history back to 1516, when Henry VIII established a "Master of the Posts", a post which eventually evolved into the office of the Postmaster General.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 14th Oct '08 9:33 PM

Martin Luther publishes his 95 Theses (posting them on the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church).

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 15th Oct '08 12:10 AM

1517 - Martin Luther publishes his 95 Theses (posting them on the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church).



flcyclist
Flcyclist  (Level: 124.6 - Posts: 691)
Wed, 15th Oct '08 1:31 AM

1518 - The Dancing Plague (or Dancing Epidemic) of 1518 was a case of dancing mania that occurred in Strasbourg, Alsace, France (then part of the Holy Roman Empire) in July 1518. Numerous people took to dancing for days without rest, and over the period of about one month, most of the people died from heart attack, stroke, or exhaustion.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 15th Oct '08 5:30 AM

1510 - Ferdinand Magellan leaves Europe to circumnavigate the world.

Leonardo da Vinci, Italian inventor and painter dies

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 15th Oct '08 6:57 PM

1520 - After navigating through the South American strait, three ships under the command of Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan reach the Pacific Ocean, becoming the first Europeans to sail from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific (the strait was later named the Strait of Magellan).


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 15th Oct '08 9:50 PM

1521 - Magellan is killed in the Philippines.
Juan Ponce de León, Spanish conquistador dies after being shot with a poison arrow
Martin Luther leaves Worms and disappears for a year - he is rumored to be murdered, but is actually in hiding at the Wartburg Castle.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 1:34 AM

The Silver Star is a 1522-mile passenger train route operated by Amtrak, running from New York City south to Miami, Florida

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 7:05 AM

Dan Brouthers had 1523 RBIs during his career. Nicknamed "Big Dan" for his size, he was 6 feet 2 inches and weighed 207 pounds, which was large for 19th-century standards.

During his career, and most notably during his time in Baltimore, he was known to always have his dog, an Irish setter named Kelly, and had him sit in the players' area. It is claimed that the players never minded much, as he was very well-behaved and never left the area to run out on the field or made very much noise.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 8:43 AM

1524 - Vasco da Gama, Portuguese explorer dies. He was the commander of the first ships to sail directly from Europe to India.

As much as anyone after Henry the Navigator, Gama was responsible for Portugal's success as an early colonising power. it was his astute mix of politics and war on the other side of the world that placed Portugal in a prominent position in Indian Ocean trade.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 11:35 AM

We bought my daughter a Dell Inspiron 1525 to use IIT. It seems to be proving itself a durable, decent unit.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 3:55 PM

The Detroit Opera House is located at 1526 Broadway Street was originally known as the Capitol Theatre. After an extensive restoration, the present Detroit Opera House celebrated its 1996 gala featuring Luciano Pavarotti.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 5:42 PM

Lou Whitaker participated in 1,527 double plays #1 in Detroit Tiger history.

Lou Whitaker is also only one of a select handful of players to ever hit a ball over the roof of old Tiger Stadium.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 6:18 PM

1528 - In Henan province of China, during the mid Ming Dynasty, a vast drought deprives the region of harvests for the next two years, killing off half the people in some communities due to starvation and cannibalism, as reported by local gazeteers.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 16th Oct '08 11:41 PM

Tris Speaker had 1,529 RBIs in his career.

As a center fielder, Speaker played so shallowly for most hitters that he was like a fifth infielder, swift of foot, chasing down potential singles. Twice in 1914, on April 21 and August 8, he executed an unassisted double play at second base, snaring low line drives on the run and then beating base runners to the bag.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 9:38 AM

1530 - The first book on dentistry was published in Germany.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 11:18 AM

The United States Video Game Decency Act of 2007 (H.R. 1531) is proposed new U.S. video game legislation.

pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 11:34 AM

In 1532 Lady Anne Boleyn is created Marquess of Pembroke by her fiancé, King Henry VIII of England.


joshua1
Joshua1  (Level: 4.6 - Posts: 42)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 11:57 AM

In the year 1533 in the country of Peru, Inca Atahualpa pays Francisco Pizarro a ransom of approx. $100 million in gold; Pizarro executes him anyway.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 2:27 PM

1534 - Jacques Cartier explores Newfoundland while searching for the Northwest Passage and is the first European to discover the St. Lawrence River.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 3:55 PM

Interstate 20 is a major east-west interstate highway in the southeastern United States. I-20 runs 1,535 miles from near Kent, Texas, at Interstate 10 to Florence, South Carolina, at Interstate 95

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 4:55 PM

In his major league career Nig Clark had 1,536 at bats.

He is best known for, in 1902 playing for Texas League's Corsicana Oil Citys, going 8 for 8 with 8 home runs. Corsicana won by the remarkable score of 51-3. The game was played in a facility that years later Clarke estimated was only 210 feet to right field.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 6:11 PM

In 1537 Paul III promulgated the papal bull Sublimus Dei against the enslavement of the indigenous peoples of the continent of America.



joetheplumber
Joetheplumber  (Level: 1.3 - Posts: 14)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 6:30 PM

1538..........the number of pennies in my giant penny jar, I'm so happy about that!

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 17th Oct '08 9:12 PM

1539 Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. He also introduces pigs into North America.

flcyclist
Flcyclist  (Level: 124.6 - Posts: 691)
Sat, 18th Oct '08 12:29 AM

1540 - Talk about your short marriage, on January 6, 1540, King Henry VIII of England marries Anne of Cleves, his fourth Queen consort. He then divorces her on July 9 of the same year. Wasting no time, he remarries on July 28 to his fifth wife, Catherine Howard.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 18th Oct '08 5:49 AM

1541 - Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto reaches the Mississippi River, naming it the Rio de Espiritu Santo ("River of the Holy Spirit").


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 18th Oct '08 6:38 AM

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,542 families residing in Dowagiac, Michigan.

The city name comes from the Potawatomi Indian word meaning "fishing water"

Dowagiac resident James Heddon invented the artificial fishing lure and in 1902 he was granted a patent for the Dowagiac Expert Lure.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 18th Oct '08 9:14 AM

May 1543 Nicolaus Copernicus publishes De revolutionibus orbium coelestium in Nuremberg.
He dies the same month.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 18th Oct '08 10:48 AM

F-14D Super Tomcat has a top speed of 1544 mph. The F-14 Tomcat was the Navy's primary air superiority fighter and tactical reconnaissance platform from 1972 to 2006.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 18th Oct '08 5:55 PM

Bad Axe Michigan had 1545 housing units on the 2000 census.

The city's unusual name dates to the time of its settlement. While surveying the first state road through the Huron County wilderness in 1861, Rudolph Papst and George Willis Pack made camp at the future site of the city and found a much-used and badly damaged axe. At Pack’s suggestion, Papst used the name “Bad Axe Camp” in the minutes of the survey and on a sign he placed along the main trail

Bad Axe High School uses the nickname "Hatchets".



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 2:06 AM

John Heywood was an English writer known for his plays, poems, and collection of proverbs.
He wrote the following epigrams in 1546:
When the sun shineth, make hay.
Look ere ye leap.
Two heads are better than one.
Love me, love my dog.
Beggars should be no choosers.
All is well that ends well.
The fat is in the fire.
I know on which side my bread is buttered.
One good turn asketh another.
A penny for your thought.
Rome was not built in one day.
Better late than never.
An ill wind that bloweth no man to good.
The more the merrier.
You cannot see the wood for the trees.
This hitteth the nail on the head.
No man ought to look a given horse in the mouth.
Many hands make light work.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 6:33 AM

The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain was set in 1547. The novel tells the story of two young boys who are identical in appearance: Tom Canty, a pauper who lives with his abusive father in Offal Court, London, and Prince Edward, son of Henry VIII of England.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 5:00 PM

Catherine Parr, the sixth and last wife of King Henry Vlll, died in 1548, one week after giving birth to her only child.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 7:57 PM

Obama had 1549 votes at the Democratic National Convention. Part way through the roll call, Senator Clinton of New York moved to suspend the rules of the roll call and nominate Obama by acclamation. This was done and the voting was never officially completed.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 11:38 PM

In 1550 chocolate was first introduced and the world's first Cafe was opened in Constantinople.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 11:42 PM

1550 - Minnesota Twin record for most career RBIs held by Harmon Killebrew.

On June 3, 1967, Killebrew hit a 520-foot home run, the longest measured home run ever hit at the Twins' Metropolitan Stadium and the longest in Twins history. That event is commemorated at the Mall of America, which includes a plaque marking home plate, and one red-painted seat from the Met which was placed at the location and elevation of the landing spot of the home run.

bbear
Bbear  (Level: 161.7 - Posts: 2301)
Sun, 19th Oct '08 11:48 PM

According to Wiki, Boris Godunov was probably born in 1551. (If Reptilicus is reading this, he could probably confirm or refute this factoid.)


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 20th Oct '08 3:44 PM

SIR WALTER RALEGH (or Raleigh), British explorer, poet and historian, was born probably in 1552, though the date is not quite certain.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 20th Oct '08 5:49 PM

Lady Jane Grey also referred to as Queen Jane, a greatniece of Henry VIII of England, was a claimant to the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Ireland. Her claimed rule of nine days in July 1553 is the shortest rule of England in its history.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 21st Oct '08 6:39 AM

1554 - After claiming the throne of England the previous year, Lady Jane Grey is beheaded for treason alongside her husband.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 21st Oct '08 3:15 PM

Rogers Hornsby had 1555 National League RBIs.

Hornsby won the triple crown in 1922, leading the league in almost every batting category including batting average (.401), home runs (42, a National League record at the time), RBI (152), slugging average (.722, another record at the time), on base percentage (.459), doubles (46), hits (250, again the highest in National League history to that point), and runs scored (141). His 450 total bases was the highest mark for any National league player during the 20th century. Hornsby also produced in the field, leading the league in putouts, double plays, and fielding percentage.

Hornsby's second triple crown came in 1925, when he combined a .403 batting average with 39 home runs and 143 RBI. He was named the National League's Most Valuable Player, having barely missed the award in 1924. His .756 slugging percentage that year is the highest in the National League during the 20th century.


salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 12:37 AM

1556 -- One of the most devastating earthquakes in history occurred near Hua Shan, in south-eastern part of Shaanxi Province on January 23, 1556, killing an estimated 830,000 people

resolsufoolps
Resolsufoolps  (Level: 20.7 - Posts: 95)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 2:46 AM

Thomas Morley, born in 1557, was an English composer, theorist, editor and organist of the Renaissance, and the foremost member of the English Madrigal School. He was the most famous composer of secular music in Elizabethan England. He and Robert Johnson are the composers of the only surviving contemporary settings of verse by Shakespeare.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 5:54 AM

1558 - The Elizabethan era begins: Queen Mary I of England dies and is succeeded by her younger half-sister Elizabeth.

It was the height of the English Renaissance and saw the flowering of English poetry and literature. This was also the time during which Elizabethan theatre flourished and William Shakespeare and many others, composed plays that broke free of England's past style of plays and theatre. It was an age of exploration and expansion abroad, while back at home, the Protestant Reformation became the national mindset of all the people.


salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 6:02 AM

Elizabeth became Queen in November of 1558,

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 6:40 AM

1559 - Led by Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano, a Spanish missionary colony of 1,500 men, on 13 ships, arrives from Vera Cruz at Pensacola Bay, founding the oldest European settlement in the mainland U.S.. (St. Augustine is founded in 1565.)

Just weeks after arrival at Pensacola, the Spanish missionary colony is decimated by a hurricane that kills hundreds, sinks five ships, with a galleon, and grounds a caravel; the 1,000 survivors divide to relocate/resupply the settlement, but suffer famine & attacks, and abandon the effort in 1561.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 10:28 AM

1560 The first tulip bulb is brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. .
Jean Nicot introduces tobacco in the form of snuff to the French court.
The oldest surviving violin (dated inside), known as the Charles IX, is made in Cremona, in northern Italy.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 11:03 AM

1561 Sir Francis Bacon, English philosopher, scientist, and statesman is born

revdodd
Revdodd  (Level: 68.7 - Posts: 775)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 11:45 AM

The current record for most miles on a standard tank of gas is 1562 miles. It was set by Kazu Tochigi in a Japanese model Prius. At 104.2 mpg, he could have driven from New York City to Dallas.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 3:47 PM

The Statute of Artificers was a group of English laws passed 1563 which regulated the supply and conduct of labour. In particular it set wages of certain classes of worker, it regulated the quality of people entering certain professions by laying down rules for apprenticeships and it restricted the free movement of workers. Effectively, it transferred to the newly forming English state the functions previously held by the feudal craft guilds

resolsufoolps
Resolsufoolps  (Level: 20.7 - Posts: 95)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 4:45 PM

The Palace Theater, located at 1564 Broadway, in New York City, opened ninety five years ago.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 6:16 PM

1565 - St. Augustine, Florida (named after St. Augustine), is established. It is the oldest remaining European settlement in the United States.

The city is one terminus of the Old Spanish Trail, which in the 1920s linked St. Augustine to San Diego, California with 3000 miles of roadways.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 22nd Oct '08 6:57 PM

The first recorded official lottery was chartered by Queen Elizabeth I, in the year 1566, and was drawn in 1569. This lottery was designed to raise money for the "reparation of the havens and strength of the Realme, and towardes such other publique good workes." Each ticket holder won a prize, and the total value of the prizes equaled the money raised.

Thus, the lottery money received was a loan to the government during the three years that the tickets were sold.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 1:59 AM

Evita ran for 1567 performances on Broadway.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 10:15 AM

The term "bulldog" was first used around 1568 and might have been applied to various ancestors of modern bulldog breeds. Bulldogs were bred in England as a cross between the mastiff and the pug.

In the 1600s, bulldogs were used for bullbaiting (as well as bearbaiting), a gambling sport popular in the 17th century with wagers laid in which trained bulldogs leapt at a bull lashed to a post, latched onto its snout and attempted to suffocate it.

pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 10:53 AM

in 1569 the first recorded lottery in England is performed nonstop at the west door of the St. Paul's Cathedral. Each share costs 10 shillings and proceeds are used to repair the harbors and for other public works

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 3:56 PM

Aurelio Rodríguez had 1570 career hits.

In an appearance on the Yes network by several great third basemen, George Brett once commented on Rodriquez's arm, saying to all (but particularly to the Phillie Great Mike Schmidt) "You remember that guy? He would toy with you and pound the ball in his glove and you were still out by 10 feet!"

In 2000, Rodriguez was visiting Detroit from his home in Mexico. While walking on Detroit's southwest side at 2:00 in the afternoon, a car jumped the curb and ran over Rodriguez. The driver of the car had suffered a stroke. Rodriguez, who had to be pulled from under the car, was 52 at the time of his death.

There have been three players in major league history named Aurelio, and all three were killed in car accidents between the ages of 44 and 53. The other two were Aurelio Lopez and Aurelio Monteagudo.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 5:08 PM

The Commodore 1571 was Commodore's high-end 5¼" floppy disk drive. With its double-sided drive mechanism, it had the ability to utilize double-sided, double-density (DS/DD) floppy disks natively.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 7:59 PM

In 1572 Sir Francis Drake undertook a circumnavigation of the world. He plundered ports in Chile and Peru and captured treasure ships. He returned to England with his ship full of spices and treasure, so gaining great acclaim.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 23rd Oct '08 10:51 PM

Armada Michigan's population was 1,573 at the 2000 census.

Armada's interest in education, literature and the arts was most evident when they persuaded Andrew Carnegie that they would support a library, if he would donate $8,000 towards the building of a permanent township library. The Armada Free Public Library was built in 1915 and is still being used to provide library service today.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 5:45 AM

Ernie Banks hit 1,574 singles.

Banks was known for his catch phrase of, "It's a beautiful day for a ballgame... Let's play two!", expressing his wish to play a doubleheader every day out of his pure love for the game of baseball, especially in his self-described "friendly confines of Wrigley Field." In 1955, he set the record for grand slams in a single season with five, a record that stood for over thirty years.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 7:37 AM

Dave Kingman ended his career with 1,575 hits. In 1982 he hit 37 home runs, a new Mets' single-season record, which stood until Darryl Strawberry hit 39 in 1987. But he also batted just .204, the lowest batting average ever recorded for a first baseman with enough plate appearances to qualify for the batting title. Leading the league in home runs that year, it is also the lowest batting average for anyone during the season they led in home runs. Additionally, he accomplished the dubious feat of leading the league in home runs while having a lower batting average than the Cy Young Award winner, (Steve Carlton, .218)

davidf
Davidf  (Level: 102.1 - Posts: 746)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 8:22 AM

Hello ....oh wrong thread do excuse me

francesann
Francesann  (Level: 55.5 - Posts: 124)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 8:37 AM

Thomas Dudley born October 12, 1576. He was born in Northampton, England and emigrated with the Winthrop fleet to Massachusetts. Incidently, John Winthrop married his wife Ann in the same church in the City of London as myself and my husband Mike.

davidf
Davidf  (Level: 102.1 - Posts: 746)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 8:41 AM

That is cool

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 9:58 AM

In 1577 Francis Drake was chosen by Queen Elizabeth l of England to command a voyage around the world.

He set sail with a fleet of six ships. His 18-gun, 100-ton flagship "Pelican" was 102 feet in length and carried nine "gentlemen" in addition to a crew of 80 (which included 40 men-at-arms, a tailor, a shoemaker, an apothecary and Drake's personal trumpeter).

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 10:23 AM

In 1578 there were 350 European fishing vessels at Newfoundland and sailors began to trade metal implements (particularly knives) for the natives' well worn pelts. These beaver robes (are blankets of sewn together, native tanned, beaver pelts) known as "castor gras" in French and "coat beaver" in English, were soon recognized by the newly-developed felt hatmaking industry as particularly useful for felting.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 12:56 PM

1579 - Sir Francis Drake, during his circumnavigation of the world, lands in what is now California, which he claims for Queen Elizabeth I. With an English claim here and in Newfoundland, it becomes the basis for English colonial charters which will claim all land from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from "sea to sea." Drake's claim is called "Nova Albion" (New England), and subsequent maps will show all lands north of New Spain and New Mexico under this name.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 6:23 PM

A male moose can weigh up to 1,580 pounds.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 24th Oct '08 11:59 PM

Bill Freehan caught 1,581 games for the Detroit Tigers. His 11 All-Star Game appearances are the most by any eligible player who is not in the Baseball Hall of Fame.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 1:00 AM

1582 - In Stratford-upon-Avon, 18 year-old William Shakespeare and 26 year-old Anne Hathaway pay a 40-pound bond for their marriage license (Shakespeare would later become one of the greatest playwrights in history).

gerryn
Gerryn  (Level: 18.7 - Posts: 141)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 6:49 AM

In January 1583 the first life insurance policy was issued on the life of William Gibbons a citizen of London. The annual premium is L32 and when Gibbons dies within the year his beneficiaries will collect L400.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 8:21 AM

1584 - Sir Walter Raleigh sends an expedition to Roanoke Island, old Virginia (now North Carolina), with a view to establishing an English colony.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 8:52 AM

1585 - Chocolate is introduced to Europe commercially

John Cotton, founder of Boston, Massachusetts is born

Sir Walter Raleigh sends an expedition to establish a colony on Roanoke Island, off the coast of North Carolina. The settlers face many problems, and soon abandon the colony.

stellamirus
Stellamirus  (Level: 180.5 - Posts: 56)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 1:06 PM

1586--Sir Thomas Herriot introduces potatoes to England.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 8:23 PM

KING FOR A DAY

1587 - Saul Wahl was elected king of Poland as a compomise candidate. Legend says he was deposed the next day. What is known of his short reign is that he passed a number of very wise laws, and among them some that tended to ameliorate the condition of the Jews in Poland.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Sat, 25th Oct '08 8:42 PM

KING FOR A DAY

1587 - Saul Wahl was elected king of Poland as a compromise candidate. Legend says he was deposed the next day. What is known of his short reign is that he passed a number of very wise laws, and among them some that tended to ameliorate the condition of the Jews in Poland.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 6:12 AM

1588 - Battle of Gravelines: The Spanish Armada is defeated by an English naval force under command of Lord Charles Howard and Sir Francis Drake off the coast of Gravelines, now in France.

The battle of Gravelines is regarded by specialists in military history as reflecting a lasting shift in the naval balance in favour of the English


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 8:36 AM

1589 - Hiroshima, Japan is founded.


donden
Donden  (Level: 112.5 - Posts: 2127)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 8:53 AM

My 1965 VW Bug was $1590 (pre-tax)

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 11:33 AM

Port Austin Township, Michigan's population was 1,591 at the 2000 census.

It is located at the tip of the Thumb of Michigan. Port Austin Township is home to beautiful rock formation along it's shoreline, which also has sandy beaches. Nearby is Port Cresent State Park, which has one of Michigan's finest sand beaches

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 12:20 PM

March 14, 1592 Pi day to the sixth digit!

3.14 1592


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 2:05 PM

Theater life became very popular in London England after the arrival in the capital of William Shakespeare, but it all came to an end the following year, in 1593, when all the theaters closed due to the Bubonic Plague.
Life must have been very hard for the actors used to performing regularly and many would have found themselves out of work. Shakespeare however was able to continue with his writing and fulfilling social contracts.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 3:14 PM

Where's Waldo?

Waldo is a city in Arkansas. The population was 1,594 at the 2000 census. Waldo celebrated its 120th year as a city in 2007. The small town was once a booming rail city on the Cotton Belt train route. The city has a rail museum with various displays showing its rail history. The city once bustling with excitement began to waine in population in the 1950s when neighboring Magnolia, Arkansas began drawing industry.

stellamirus
Stellamirus  (Level: 180.5 - Posts: 56)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 3:30 PM

Best Western Inn and Suites is located at 1596 Fairgrounds Drive, Vallejo, CA.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 4:19 PM

1595 - William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet is probably first performed

1596 - see above

1597 - Probable first performance of William Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 6:28 PM

Lawrence County is a county located in Tennessee. The County has an area of 1,598 km².

The county was named in honor of Captain James Lawrence (1781-1813) who, while commanding the USS Chesapeake in an 1813 engagement with the Royal Navy frigate HMS Shannon, issued the famous command: "Don't give up the ship!". Lawrence died of wounds received during the engagement.



pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 6:44 PM

1599 the Globe theatre opened in London

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 7:28 PM

Ed Killian pitcher who clinched 1907 pennant for Tigers with two wins in doubleheader; allowed 9 home runs in 1600 career innings, none from 1903-07

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 8:11 PM

"1601: Conversation, as it was by the Social Fireside in the time of the Tudors" - A humorous novel by Mark Twain considered very risque at the time.

felix
Felix  (Level: 109.3 - Posts: 2500)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 8:14 PM

1602: The number of posts deleted by editors this past week. OMG! I just kill me, sometimes!

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 9:02 PM

1603 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin's grandson, King James VI of Scotland, uniting the crowns of Scotland and England.

"She is only a woman, only mistress of half an island," marvelled Pope Sixtus V, "and yet she makes herself feared by Spain, by France, by the Empire, by all".

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 10:22 PM

Chesapeake and Ohio #1604: One of two surviving "Allegheny"-class 2-6-6-6 locomotives. The "Allegheny" name refers to the C&O locomotives' job of hauling heavy coal trains up and down the Allegheny Mountains.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 26th Oct '08 11:41 PM

Strasbourg, France 1605 - the world's first newspaper is printed.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 2:52 AM

Willem Janszoon made the first recorded European landfall on the Australian continent in 1606 in the Duyfken. Finding the land swampy and the people inhospitable and with the killing of some of his men on various shore expeditions, he apparently decided to turn back at Cape Keerweer ("Cape Turnabout").


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 5:42 AM

1607 - Jamestown, Virginia, is settled as what would become the first permanent English colony in North America.

Despite inspired leadership of John Smith, chaplain Robert Hunt and others, starvation, hostile relations with the Indians, and lack of profitable exports all threatened the survival of the Colony in the early years as the settlers and the Virginia Company of London each struggled. However, colonist John Rolfe introduced a strain of tobacco which was successfully exported in 1612, and the financial outlook for the colony became more favorable. Two years later, Rolfe married the young Indian woman Pocahontas, daughter of Wahunsunacock, Chief of the Powhatan Confederacy, and a period of relative peace with the Natives followed. In 1616, the Rolfes made a public relations trip to England, where Pocahontas was received as visiting royalty.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 8:53 AM

1608 - English Poet John Milton born. Milton's literary career cast a formidable shadow over English poetry in the 18th and 19th centuries; he was often judged equal or superior to all other English poets, including Shakespeare.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 3:51 PM

1609 - Galileo Galilei demonstrates his first telescope to Venetian lawmakers. He is the first to perform observational astronomy as he observes the moons of Jupiter,

Jamestown: Seven ships arrive at the colony, with 200-300 men, women, and children,

Henry Hudson discovers the Hudson River

"Three Blind Mice" is published by London teenage songwriter Thomas Ravenscroft.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 4:03 PM

1610 - In Jamestown, Virginia, only 60 out of 500 settlers survive over winter


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 6:32 PM

The Authorized King James Version is first published in 1611 by the Church of England. In most of the world, the Authorized Version has passed out of copyright and is freely reproduced. In the United Kingdom, the British Crown holds perpetual Crown copyright to the Authorized Version. Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and the Queen's Printers have the right to produce the Authorized Version.



stellamirus
Stellamirus  (Level: 180.5 - Posts: 56)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 10:21 PM

1612: Shah Jahan marries Mumtaz Mahal.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 27th Oct '08 10:45 PM

Billy Jurges had 1,613 hits in his career.

During the 1930s, he was central to three (1932, 1935 and 1938) National League championship Chicago Cubs teams. In July 1932, Jurges recovered from gunshot wounds — suffered when a distraught former girlfriend tried to kill him — to help lead the Cubs to the NL flag.

The shooting incident would form the basis for Bernard Malamud's novel The Natural.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 1:18 AM

In 1614 the first Dutch settlers arrived and founded a number of villages and a town called New Amsterdam on the East Coast, which would become the future world metropolis of New York.

Martin van Buren, was the eighth President of the United States. He was the first president who was not of English, Irish, or Scottish descent. He is also the only president not to have spoken English as his first language, but rather grew up speaking Dutch.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 10:59 AM

In 1615 the New Netherland Company was granted a 3-year monopoly in North American trade between the 40th and 45th parallels.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 11:38 AM

The New England Indian smallpox epidemic of 1616 begins to depopulate the region, killing an estimated 90% of the costal native peoples.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 12:32 PM

A brand new concept in transportation was introduced in London, England in 1617 - the first one-way streets.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 3:42 PM

1618 - English adventurer, writer, and courtier Sir Walter Raleigh is beheaded for allegedly conspiring against James I of England.

One of the judges at his trial later said: "the justice of England has never been so degraded and injured as by the condemnation of Sir Walter Raleigh."



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 5:39 PM

In 1619, Italian philosopher, Lucilio Vanini was burned alive at the stake for his proposal that humans evolved from apes.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 6:44 PM

1620
The Mayflower departs from Plymouth, England, on its 3rd attempt without the Speedwell, arriving on November 11 at Cape Cod (named from Concord voyage of 1602).

November 11 - The Mayflower arrives inside the tip of Cape Cod, with the Pilgrims and Planters.
November 11 - Plymouth Colony settlers sign the Mayflower Compact


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Tue, 28th Oct '08 7:38 PM

The first American Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 to commemorate the harvest reaped by the Plymouth Colony after a harsh winter. In that year Governor William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 12:01 AM

Al Kaline scored 1622 runs during his career.

In 1955, Kaline hit .340 for the season, becoming the youngest player ever to win the American League batting title, when he was one day younger than Tigers hall-of-famer Ty Cobb.

During the 1955 season, Kaline became the 13th man in major league history to hit two home runs in the same inning



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 12:16 AM

1623 The first American temperance law is enacted, in Virginia.


texlewee
Texlewee  (Level: 34.1 - Posts: 601)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 12:21 AM

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1624

It was a reaffirmation of the UN's stance on global terrorism.

http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/other/65761.htm

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 1:55 AM

1625 - The Dutch settle Manhattan, founding the town of New Amsterdam. The town would transform into a piece of what is now New York City

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 6:18 AM

1626 Peter Minuit buys Manhattan from a Native American tribe (Lenape or Shinnecock or Canarsie) for trade goods, valued at 60 guilders ($24).

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 1:16 PM

White Pigeon is a village in the state of Michigan. The population was 1,627 at the 2000 census.

White Pigeon was incorporated in 1837, and is the oldest incorporated village in the State of Michigan. Downtown White Pigeon boasts a historic building listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the United States Land Office, which is the oldest surviving U.S. Land office in the state of Michigan. Out of this office the U.S. government sold land in Michigan for $1.25 an acre in the 1830s to settlers of Western Michigan.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 8:03 PM

The classic novel The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas, père takes place in 1628. The story includes fictionalized versions of actual historical events of this year, such as the siege of La Rochelle and the assassination of the Duke of Buckingham

stellamirus
Stellamirus  (Level: 180.5 - Posts: 56)
Wed, 29th Oct '08 10:50 PM

Christiaan Huygens, Dutch mathematician, astronomer and physicist, was born in The Hague in 1629. Some years later, he discovered the rings of Saturn as well as its moon, Titan.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 1:49 AM

1630 - Native American Quadequine introduces popcorn to English colonists.

Massachusetts Bay Colony outlaws the possession of cards, dice, and gaming tables.

The city of Boston, Massachusetts is founded.

First year of Deccan famine in India--which will kill some 2,000,000 in 3 years.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 6:35 AM

At 1,631 feet high, WWTV's transmitter tower is the tallest in the state of Michigan. When atmospheric conditions are right, WWTV's signal can be picked up as far east as Lansing and the northern suburbs of Detroit (when CBET in Windsor, Ontario is off-the-air), and as far west as the communities on Wisconsin's eastern shore of Lake Michigan.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 7:04 AM

1632 - Charles I of England issues a charter for the colony of Maryland (named in honor of Henrietta Maria), under the control of Lord Baltimore.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 9:46 AM

'Tis Pity She's a Whore is a tragedy written by John Ford.and published in 1633. The play's treatment of the subject of incest made it one of the most controversial works in English literature. The play was entirely omitted from an 1831 collected edition of Ford's plays

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 6:11 PM

1634 - Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin in the summer, dressed in traditional Chinese robes, since he thinks that Lake Michigan is really the Pacific Ocean, leading to the Ming Dynasty of China.



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 9:18 PM

Thomas Parr, an English man, died in 1635 at the age of 152.

He did not marry until he was 80 years old & had 2 children who died in infancy.
He attributed his long life to his vegetarian diet & moral temperance, although when he was 100 years old he had an affair and a child born out of wedlock. After the death of his first wife he married again at the age of 122.
As the news of his age spread he was brought to London to meet King Charles l. Whilst in London he was treated as a spectacle but the change in food & environment apparently caused his death.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 11:12 PM

Ernie Banks batted in 1,636 runs.

He was the first shortstop in the history of the National League to win the MVP award in back to back seasons. Jimmy Dykes reportedly remarked that, "Without him, the Cubs would finish in Albuquerque!"



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 30th Oct '08 11:43 PM

The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1637 between an alliance of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, with Native American allies (the Narragansett and Mohegan tribes), against the Pequot tribe. This war saw the elimination of the Pequot as a viable polity in what is present-day southern New England.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 5:46 AM

1638 - The Swedish arrive on the ships Kalmare Nyckel and Fågel Grip to America, to establish the first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 2:20 PM

Jeremiah Horrocks was an English astronomer who was the only person to predict, and one of only two people to observe and record, the transit of Venus of 1639.

A transit of Venus across the Sun takes place when the planet Venus passes directly between the Sun and Earth, obscuring a small portion of the Sun's disk. During a transit, Venus can be seen from Earth as a small black disk moving across the face of the Sun.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 3:18 PM

Macomb County, Michigan has 1640 people per square mile.

The county gained fame in the 1980s and '90s as a bellwether of state and national politics. Macomb's large cohort of working-class, socially conservative whites gave it one of the nation's most prominent concentrations of "Reagan Democrats",

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 6:11 PM

Burlington, Massachusetts was first settled in 1641.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 6:11 PM

Burlington, Massachusetts was first settled in 1641.

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 8:01 PM

Sir Isaac Newton was born in 1642 the same year that Galileo died. Newton was born into a poor farming family. Luckily he wasn't a good farmer and so he went to university and became a physicist and mathematician. He laid the foundation of physics including developing the 3 laws of motion.

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 8:04 PM

Or was he born in 1643? There seems to be some disagreement.

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 8:09 PM

1644 marked the end of the Ming dynasty which had ruled China for nearly 300 years. It started in 1368.

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 8:10 PM

The Ming dynasty is famous for it's art and literature particularly the blue and white porcelain that was made in this period.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 31st Oct '08 8:27 PM

U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles

The southern terminus of the route is at U.S. Route 90 in the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge in eastern New Orleans, Louisiana. The northern terminus is at the United States-Canada border in Rouses Point, New York,

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 12:59 AM

German mathematican Gottfried Leibniz was born in 1646.

He invented infinitesimal calculus independently of Newton, and his notation is the one in general use since then. He also invented the binary system, foundation of virtually all modern computer architectures.

In philosophy, he is mostly remembered for optimism, i.e. his conclusion that our universe is, in a restricted sense, the best possible one God could have made.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 1:18 AM

In 1647, the English Parliament passed a law that made Christmas illegal.
Christmas festivities were banned by Puritan leader Oliver Cromwell who considered feasting & revelry, on what was supposed to be a holy day, to be immoral. Anyone caught celebrating was arrested.
The ban was only lifted when the Puritans lost power 13 years later.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 7:57 AM

1648
January 30 - The Dutch and the Spanish sign the Treaty of Munster, ending the Eighty Years' War.

October 24 - The Treaty of Westphalia ends the Thirty Years' War.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 12:48 PM

Built in 1649 The Old House is an historic home in Cutchogue in Suffolk County, New York. It is "notable as one of the most distinguished surviving examples of English domestic architecture in America."

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 7:35 PM

The first recorded coffeehouse in England opened in Oxford in 1650.

These coffeehouses were rather like a club house and they soon became a social hub for sharing news and ideas. For just a penny, customers could visit to read the newspaper, socialize, debate and smoke tobacco as they sipped their cup of coffee.

haydn
Haydn  (Level: 198.9 - Posts: 254)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 7:55 PM

In 1651, Massachusetts passed laws forbidding poor people from dressing too extravagantly. Makes me wonder how the law was enforced.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 1st Nov '08 8:29 PM

1652 - Rhode Island passes the first law in North America making slavery illegal.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 12:09 AM

The Taj Mahal, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, was constructed over a period of twenty-three years, employing twenty thousand workers.
It was completed in 1653 at a cost of 32 million rupees (approx. US $68,000).

toledosugar
Toledosugar  (Level: 51.4 - Posts: 281)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 12:18 AM

In 1654, the Treaty of Westminster ended the first Anglo-Dutch War.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 4:46 AM

The locomotive works in Lima, Ohio turned out 1,655 Sherman Tanks during WWII,

The company started manufacturing locomotives in 1869. A new “super power” design, introduced in 1925, enabled Lima to capture 20 percent of the national market for locomotives. The first “super power” locomotive was the creation of mechanical engineer William E. Woodard. Designed to make more efficient use of steam at high speed, it became, in the words of engineer and railroad historian Eric Hirsimaki, “one of the most influential locomotives in the history of steam power.” Later years saw the introduction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway 2-6-6-6, one of the largest locomotives ever built, and the glamorous Southern Pacific “Daylights,” designed to complement the Pacific Coast scenery.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 6:08 AM

Captain Myles Standish died in 1656

Standish is often remembered for his bravery in battle and his reputation as the military captain of the Pilgrims, as well as a character in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's fictitious poem The Courtship of Miles Standish.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 12:02 PM

Milton, Delawared had a population of 1,657 at the 2000 census. The town was known by various names until 1807, when it was named for the English poet, John Milton.

History and Milton's shipbuilding heritage remain very important to the town, which is home to some of the finest Victorian and Colonial architecture in Delaware. Many of the homes have been restored to their original form, particularly those on Union and Federal streets.





sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 2:16 PM

Oliver Cromwell died in 1658. He was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was one of the commanders of the New Model Army which defeated the royalists in the English Civil War. After the execution of King Charles I in 1649, Cromwell dominated the short-lived Commonwealth of England, conquered Ireland and Scotland, and ruled as Lord Protector from 1653 until his death in 1658.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 2nd Nov '08 3:26 PM

1659 - The first known cheque (400 pounds) is written (on display at Westminster Abbey).

Robinson Crusoe is shipwrecked (fiction)

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 3rd Nov '08 5:09 AM

In 1660 was the first study of football, given in Francis Willughby's Book of Sports. This account is particularly noteworthy as he refers to football by its correct name and is the first to describe the following: goals and a pitch ("a close that has a gate at either end. The gates are called Goals"), tactics ("leaving some of their best players to guard the goal"), scoring ("they that can strike the ball through their opponents' goal first win") and the way teams were selected ("the players being equally divided according to their strength and nimbleness"). He is the first to describe a law of football: "They often break one another's shins when two meet and strike both together against the ball, and therefore there is a law that they must not strike higher than the ball". His book includes the first (basic) diagram illustrating a modern football pitch.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 3rd Nov '08 3:50 PM

Lincoln's Inn Fields opened in 1661, with the first "moveable" or "changeable" scenery used on the British public stage, i.e. wings or shutters that ran in grooves and could be smoothly and mechanically changed between or even within acts.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 3rd Nov '08 6:18 PM

Blaise Pascal died in 1662. He was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a civil servant. Anders Hald writes, "To lighten his father's work as a tax official, Pascal invented a calculating machine for addition and subtraction and took care of its construction and sale."

Pascal was a mathematician of the first order. He helped create two major new areas of research. He wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of sixteen, and later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 6:00 AM

1663: Maryland legalizes slavery

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 7:29 AM

In 1664 New Amsterdam was taken over by British forces under the Duke of York (later King James II) and renamed New York.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 7:44 AM

In 1665, England had her last large outbreak of the Black Death.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 9:18 AM

1666 - The year is also known for having all the Roman numerals, used only once, in order from biggest to smallest value.
(MDCLXVI)

Great Fire of London: A large fire breaks out in London in the house of Charles II's baker on Pudding Lane near London Bridge. The fire burns for 3 days, destroying 10,000 buildings including St. Paul's Cathedral, but only 16 people are known to have died. People claim that it is the Devil's deed, for 1666 contains 666.



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 9:46 AM

1667 - The first ice cream known to have been eaten in England is served at Windsor Castle.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 3:58 PM

Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan and Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario were formally founded in 1668 by Father Jacques Marquette as one city, then split into two in 1797 (when the Upper Peninsula was transferred from the province of Upper Canada to the United States).

Sault Ste. Marie is the oldest city in both the state of Michigan and in the entire Midwest region of the United States. It is at the eastern edge of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, on the Canadian border, separated from its twin -albeit larger- city of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario - the oldest city in the Canadian province of Ontario - by the St. Marys River.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 6:18 PM

1669 - Mount Etna erupts, destroying the town of Nicolosi and killing 20,000 people.

Famine in Bengal kills 3 million people.

Antonio Stradivari makes his first violin.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 8:16 PM

Cohasset, Massachusetts was first settled in 1670. The town's name came from the Algonquian word "Conahasset," meaning "long rocky place." The layout of the town was distinctive. Many lots were laid out in long narrow strips, facilitating more lots having road frontage, and avoiding back lots.

The Witches of Eastwick (1987), starring Cher, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Jack Nicholson was filmed in Cohasset.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 4th Nov '08 11:16 PM

Bobby Veach played 1,671 innings in the American League.

Bobby Veach was the starting left fielder for the Detroit Tigers for eleven years from 1913-1923. Despite being one of the most productive hitters in baseball during his years in Detroit, Veach played in the shadows of three Detroit outfielders who won 16 batting titles and were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: Ty Cobb in center field and Sam Crawford followed by Harry Heilmann in right field.

Veach was the only player to pinch hit for Babe Ruth (August 9, 1925) in the years after the Babe was converted from a pitcher to an outfielder.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 5th Nov '08 5:27 AM

Peter Stuyvesant died in 1672. He was a major figure in the early history of New York City.

Stuyvesant's accomplishments as director-general included a great expansion for the settlement of New Netherlands (later renamed New York) beyond the southern tip of Manhattan. Among the projects built by Stuyvesant's administration were the protective wall on Wall Street, the canal that became Broad Street, and Broadway.



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Wed, 5th Nov '08 10:34 AM

1673 - The first metal dental fillings are installed by English surgeons.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 5th Nov '08 7:10 PM

Tommy Bridges struck out 1674 batters.

Bridges and Hank Greenberg are the only players in Detroit Tigers history to play in four World Series for the team, having appeared in the 1934, 1935, 1940, and 1945 World Series



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 6th Nov '08 5:07 AM

1675: Gottfried Leibniz writes the integral sign ∫ in an unpublished manuscript, introducing the calculus notation that's still in use today.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 6th Nov '08 8:12 AM

BART - Bay Area Rapid Transit - San Francisco Bay Area.uses broad gauge tracks that are 1,676 mm wide. Standard guage tracks are 1,435 mm.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Thu, 6th Nov '08 9:22 AM

1677 - Massachusetts gains title to Maine for $6,000


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 6th Nov '08 11:23 AM

In 1678 the Dutch were defending Las Aves against a superior French fleet.

As night fell, lanterns were lit. Simulating the lights of a town, the Dutch sailors hoped to convince the French that they had reached Bonaire. In so doing, they could attract the French galleons onto the reef. The Admiral headed his flagship, the 70-gun le Terrible - straight for the trap and directly towards the coral reef, against the advice of his subordinates, who suspected the danger. By the time the breakers were spotted, it was too late. Le Terrible couldn't avoid the reef. d’Estrées fired guns to warn off the rest of the fleet, but the crews of the other ships thought he was under attack by the Dutch and rushed to his aid. One by one, the rest of the 17 vessels in the fleet struck the reef and sank. 500 sailors drowned.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 6th Nov '08 6:20 PM

1679 European explorers discover Niagara Falls.

The brigantine Le Griffon, commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes.

A fire in Boston, Massachusetts, burns all of the warehouses, 80 houses, and all of the ships in the dockyards.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 6:07 AM

The Alaskan Highway is 1680 miles long. It crosses the Yukon-BC border six times from Mile 590 to Mile 596.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 8:59 AM

1681 - the dodo became extinct as the last of the species died on the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius.

The dodo, a flightless bird related to the pigeon but as large as a turkey, was killed off by Europeans for food.

Hence the phrase "dead as a dodo".

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 11:25 AM

1682 - At the mouth of the Mississippi River, near modern Venice, Louisiana, Robert de La Salle buries an engraved plate and a cross, claiming the territory as La Louisiane for France.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 12:51 PM

Curt Flood played 1,683 games in center field.

Despite his outstanding playing career, Flood's principal legacy developed off the field. He believed that Major League Baseball's decades-old reserve clause was unfair in that it kept players beholden for life to the team with whom they originally signed, even when they had satisfied the terms and conditions of those contracts.

His legacy was remembered in Congress via a bill, the Baseball Fans and Communities Protection Act of 1997; numbered HR 21 (Flood's Cardinals uniform number) and introduced on the first day of the 105th Congress in 1997 by Rep. John Conyers, Jr. (D-Michigan), removing baseball's controversial antitrust exemption with regards to labor. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) introduced similar legislation in the Senate that year, called the Curt Flood Act of 1998.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 12:55 PM

1684 The British East India Company receives Chinese permission to build a trading station at Canton. Tea sells in Europe for less than a shilling a pound, but the import duty of 5 shillings makes it too expensive for most English people to afford.
Smuggled tea is drunk much more than legally imported tea.

England has its coldest winter in living memory; the River Thames and the sea as far as 2 miles out from land freezes over.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 1:04 PM

In 1685, Saint John Baptist de La Salle, founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, founded what is generally considered the first normal school, the École Normale, — that is, a school whose purpose is to train teachers — in Reims.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 5:51 PM

Rutland Massachusetts' original lands of about 12 square miles were purchased from natives in Natick's Indian Praying Town in 1686.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 7th Nov '08 9:52 PM

Tommy Tucker played 1,657 games with the Boston Beaneaters (1890-1897), Washington Senators (1897), Brooklyn Bridegrooms (1898), St. Louis Browns (1898) and Cleveland Spiders (1899).

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 12:21 AM

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is officially set at 1688 km, (1,049 miles) which honors Alaska's status as the 49th state.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 1:49 AM

The largest Atlantic Giant squash (popularly called a pumpkin, depending upon fruit color) on record weighted 1689 pounds.

Seeds from pumpkins that have been proven to produce big pumpkins can be sold at online auctions for considerable sums of money. The largest contest award paid for a single pumpkin was $53,000 USD to Nathan & Paula Zehr for the first 1,000 lb pumpkin (1061 lb actual weight) at the Clarence NY World Pumpkin Confederation Weigh-Off in 1996. The highest price paid for a single pumpkin seed was USD$850 for a 1068 Wallace seed in 2006.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 6:36 AM

1690 First Franciscan missionaries arrive in Texas


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 10:48 AM

Presque Isle Township in Michigan had a population of 1,691 at the 2000 census.

Presque Isle (literally, "almost an island") is French for "peninsula". A large part of the township consists of that peninsula, with Lake Huron on the east and Grand Lake on the west and narrows strips of land connecting it to the mainland at the north and south ends. The community of Presque Isle is situated near the center of this peninsula.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 2:56 PM

1693 Salem witch trial investigations and convictions lead to several months of hangings. By the end of September 14 women, including Bridget Bishop, and 5 men had been hanged. Another man tortured to death in an attempt to coerce a guilty plea from him.

An afternoon earthquake and three resultant tidal waves destroy Port Royal, capital of Jamaica and submerges a major part of it - an estimated 2,000 are immediately killed, 2,300 injured, and a probable additional 2,000 die from the diseases which ravage the island in the following months.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 3:46 PM

Should have read:

1692 Salem witch trial investigations and convictions lead to several months of hangings. By the end of September 14 women, including Bridget Bishop, and 5 men had been hanged. Another man tortured to death in an attempt to coerce a guilty plea from him.

An afternoon earthquake and three resultant tidal waves destroy Port Royal, capital of Jamaica and submerges a major part of it - an estimated 2,000 are immediately killed, 2,300 injured, and a probable additional 2,000 die from the diseases which ravage the island in the following months.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 4:14 PM

1693 - 1st woman's magazine "Ladies Mercury" was published in London.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 6:36 PM

Harwich, Massachusetts incorporated in 1694.

The town is known for its many cranberry salt bogs, which produce cranberries that are commercially farmed.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 8th Nov '08 10:37 PM

The English had 1,695 casualties at the Battle of Trafalgar.

The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the 18th century. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost twenty-two ships, without a single British vessel being lost.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 5:54 AM

Fremont, Indiana's population was 1,696 at the 2000 census.

Settled in 1834 as Willow Prairie, it became the Village of Brockville when it was platted in 1837. In 1848, it was renamed to honor John C. Frémont, "the Great Pathfinder", in part because there was already a Brockville in Indiana.

Someone traveling due east from Fremont crosses into Michigan -- not into Ohio. This is due to the early 19th century Ohio-Michigan boundary dispute over Toledo

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 6:34 AM

A peak along the Hudson River has been known as Anthony's Nose since 1697.

Pierre Van Cortlandt, who owned this mountain, said it was named for a pre-Revolutionary War sea captain, Anthony Hogan. This captain was reputed to have a Cyrano de Bergerac type nose. One of his mates, looking at this mount, as they sailed by it, compared it to that of the captain's nose. He said that they looked similar in size. This good-natured joke soon spread, and the name Anthony's Nose stuck to this peak.

mplaw51
Mplaw51  (Level: 179.5 - Posts: 1582)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 8:18 AM

1698 AD - Christian Huygens, renowned scientist, writes Cosmotheoros, or Conjectures Concerning the Planetary Worlds, a non-fictional premise on life on other planets

This was the English translation of the latin publication, Huygens actually died in 1695.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 12:55 PM

The first Mardi Gras festivities in America were held in New Orleans in 1699.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 3:06 PM

Monkeys "Able" and "Baker" became the first monkeys to survive spaceflight after their 1959 flight. The monkeys rode in the nosecone of the missile a distance of 1,700 miles down the Atlantic Missile Range from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 6:20 PM

In 1701, the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac founded a settlement called Fort Ponchartrain du Détroit, naming it after the comte de Pontchartrain, Minister of Marine under Louis XIV.

The settlement's name later became Detroit. The name comes from the Detroit River (French: l'étroit du Lac Érié), meaning the strait of Lake Erie, linking Lake Huron and Lake Erie;

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 9th Nov '08 11:24 PM

1702 - Mobile (now Alabama) is founded as capital of Louisiana by governor J.B. le Moyne de Bienville

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 6:32 AM

The Great Storm of 1703 is arguably the most severe storm or natural disaster ever recorded in the southern part of Britain. It affected southern England and the English Channel. A 120-mph "perfect hurricane", it started on 24 November, and did not die down until 2 December 1703 (Old Style).

The Great Storm coincided with the increase in English journalism, and was the first weather event to be a news story on a national scale. Special issue broadsheets were produced detailing damage to property and stories of people who had been killed.



mplaw51
Mplaw51  (Level: 179.5 - Posts: 1582)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 7:59 AM

1704 AD Battle of Blenheim - The English and the Dutch won a stunning victory over French and Bavarian forces in the Battle of Blenheim on August 13, 1704. England’s Duke of Marlborough led the British. He led a cavalry charge that broke the French lines and forced many of their soldiers into the Danube, where hundreds died. The French and their allies lost 4,500 dead and 11,000 wounded. The British captured 11,000 prisoners. They suffered 670 dead and 1,500 wounded.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 8:36 AM

November 1705 - Construction is completed on the capitol building In Williamsburg, capital of the Virginia colony in America,

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 9:19 AM

1706 Benjamin Franklin was born on Milk Street, in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 17,

Franklin bequeathed £1,000 (about $4,400 at the time) each to the cities of Boston and Philadelphia, in trust to gather interest for 200 years. The trust began in 1785 As of 1990, more than $2,000,000 had accumulated in Franklin's Philadelphia trust, which had loaned the money to local residents. From 1940 to 1990, the money was used mostly for mortgage loans. When the trust came due, Philadelphia decided to spend it on scholarships for local high school students. Franklin's Boston trust fund accumulated almost $5,000,000 during that same time, and was used to establish a trade school that became the Franklin Institute of Boston

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 9:28 AM

Wow - what a good example of how long-term investing can pay off.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 9:55 AM

1707 The Acts of Union becomes law, uniting the Parliaments of the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Scotland to form the Parliament of a united Kingdom of Great Britain.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 6:39 PM

Don't you wish your ancestors had put away a few dollars for you?

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 6:49 PM

In 1708 an 11-year-old girl and her 7-year-old brother were convicted of theft of a loaf of bread in King's Lynn, England and sentenced to death by hanging, a sentence which was carried out publicly from the South Gates of the town to make an example out of them.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 10th Nov '08 10:49 PM

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,709 families residing in Larchmont, New York.

Larchmont's oldest and most historic home, the "Manor House" on Elm Avenue, was built in 1797 by Peter Jay Munro. Munro was the nephew to John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, and was later adopted by Jay. Munro's house faced towards the Boston Post Road (the back is now used as the front), which tended to generate a lot of dust in summer months. To combat this, his gardener imported a Scottish species of larch trees that were known to be fast growing. These were planted along the front of the property, eventually giving the village its name. The Village of Larchmont was incorporated in 1891.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 5:22 AM

Mickey Mantle struck out 1,710 times which is a record for New York Yankees.

Beginning in 1997, the Topps Baseball Card company retired the card #7 in its base sets in tribute to Mantle, whose career was taking off just as Topps began producing baseball cards. Mantle's cards, especially his 1952 Topps card, are extremely popular and valuable among card collectors. Though Topps un-retired the #7 in 2006, the number is reserved for cards of Mantle, remade with each year's design.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 6:47 AM

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,711 families residing in Lampasas, Texas.

Several theories attempt to explain how the name Lampasas came to be. The Texas Almanac states the word came from a Spanish word for “lilies” that are found in nearby streams. Another source states the word comes from the Spanish word “Lampazos.” The name was given to the local river by the Spanish Aquayo Expedition in 1721. It is believed the name was inspired by a Mexican town that also had beautiful springs.



maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 8:10 AM

1712 - A black insurrection takes place in New York City; 21 blacks are executed after the militia suppresses the rebellion

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 6:08 PM

The English author and clergyman Laurence Sterne was born in 1713. His most famous work was "The Life and Times of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman" or just "Tristram Shandy".

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 6:17 PM

In 1714 Gabriel Fahrenheit built a mercury thermometer which would subsequently have a scale named after him.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 6:56 PM

1936 Cleveland Indians had 1715 hits (.305 team batting average). Despite their offensive power they finished in 5th place and 22.5 games behind the league leading Yankees.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 11th Nov '08 9:28 PM

1716 Natchez, Mississippi is founded The original site of Natchez was the main ceremonial village of the Natchez (pronounced "Nochi") Indian tribe, who occupied the area for countless generations (and whose culture was unbroken since the 8th-century, according to archaeological findings). Many early explorers, including De Soto, La Salle and Bienville made contact with the Natchez, some of whom left detailed records of their encounters.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 5:48 AM

Ben Chapman played in 1717 Major League Baseball games.

Although he made his name as a fast, ferocious and hard-nosed player, that reputation was eclipsed by the racist role he played in 1947 as manager of the Phillies, opposing the presence of Jackie Robinson on a major league team on the basis of Robinson's race.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 8:16 AM

1718 Citing violations of an amnesty agreement with Blackbeard, Virginia Governor Alexander Spottswood sends a Royal Navy contingent to North Carolina, where they battle Blackbeard and his crew in Ocracoke Inlet. Blackbeard is killed in action after receiving 5 musketball wounds and 20 sword lacerations.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 9:09 AM

The novel "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe was first published in 1719 and is one of the oldest and most famous adventure stories in English literature.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 3:44 PM

Born in 1720 Chief Pontiac was an Ottawa leader.

In May 1763 when Pontiac and 300 followers attempted to take Fort Detroit by surprise. His plan foiled, Pontiac laid siege to the fort, and was eventually joined by more than 900 warriors from a half-dozen tribes. Meanwhile, messengers spread the word of Pontiac's actions, and the war expanded far beyond Detroit. In October he lifted the siege and withdrew to the Illinois country.

The city of Pontiac, Michigan was named for him, as well as cities in Illinois and Quebec. Pontiac is also the name of a popular General Motors automobile brand.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 4:41 PM

Waterville, New York's population according to the 2000 census was 1,721.

Around 1820 hop farming (humulus lupulus) was introduced and by 1875, Waterville was considered the "Hop Capital of the World." Several inventions essential to the raising and curing of hops were created in the area, the most important of which was the liquid Hop Extract, and in the late 1860s the International Hop Stock Exchange was established.

Although the last of the hop farms closed in the 1940s, some residents still enjoy growing hop vines as a hobby or for decorative and/or historic reasons rather than for brewing beer.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 4:57 PM

Samuel Adams was born in 1722. He was an American statesman, politician, writer and political philosopher, brewer, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Adams was instrumental in garnering the support of the colonies for rebellion against Great Britain, eventually resulting in the American Revolution, and was also one of the key architects of the principles of American republicanism that shaped American political culture. He was the second cousin of John Adams.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 12th Nov '08 11:25 PM

Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek died in 1723. He was a Dutch tradesman and scientist from the Netherlands. He is commonly known as "the Father of Microbiology", and considered to be the first microbiologist.

Using his handcrafted microscopes he was the first to observe and describe single celled organisms, which he originally referred to as animalcules, and which we now refer to as microorganisms. He was also the first to record microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa and blood flow in capillaries (small blood vessels).


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 3:19 AM

The 1921 Detroit Tigers amassed 1,724 hits, an American League record. Their .316 team batting average is also a league record.

Detroit outfielders Harry Heilmann and Ty Cobb finished #1 and #2 in the American League batting race with batting averages of .394 and .389, and all three Detroit outfielders (Heilmann, Cobb, and Bobby Veach) ranked among the league leaders in batting average and RBIs. As early proof of the baseball adage that "Good Pitching Beats Good Hitting," the downfall of the 1921 Tigers was the absence of good pitching. The team ERA was 4.40, they allowed nine or more runs 28 times, and only one pitcher (Dutch Leonard) had an ERA below 4.24.

The Tigers finished in sixth place in the American League, 27 games behind the Yankees, with a record of 71-82.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 4:26 AM

On February 8, 1725, Peter the Great, emperor of Russia, dies and is succeeded by his wife, Catherine.

Peter founded the new Russian capital of St. Petersburg, and Russia became a major European power--politically, culturally, and geographically.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 2:35 PM

French chess player François-André Danican Philidor was born in 1726.

In 1749, Philidor published his famous book Analyse du jeu des Échecs. The book was such an advance in chess knowledge that by 1871, it had gone through about 70 editions, and had been translated into English, German and Italian. In it, Philidor analyzed nine different types of game openings. Most of the openings of Philidor are designed to strengthen and establish a strong defensive center using pawns. He is the first one to realize the new role of the pawn in the chess game; and his most famous advice was the saying "The pawns are the soul of chess".

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 3:47 PM

Sir Isaac Newton, British scientist died in 1727

Newton was modest of his own achievements, famously writing in a letter to Robert Hooke in February 1676

“ If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants ”


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 5:26 PM

Milt Pappas struck out 1728 batters during his career.

In 1998, as Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa surpassed Roger Maris’ single season home run record, Pappas admitted that he threw nothing but fastballs to Maris in giving up Roger’s 59th home run in 1961. Pappas explained that he was upset that commissioner Ford Frick was planning to put an asterisk next to the new home run mark if Maris did not eclipse Babe Ruth’s 60 home runs in 1927 on or before the Yankees’ 154th game.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 6:32 PM

As of the census of 2000 there were 1,729 families residing in Manistee, Michigan.

Manistee is locally known as "The Stee". It is said that the name "Manistee" is a Native American word first applied to the principal river of the county. Specifically, it is said it could be interpreted as: 'river at whose mouth there are islands.' But see, Manistee River, which says it is from the Ojibwa word Manistiqweita, meaning "Crooked River"

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 13th Nov '08 8:57 PM

Rocco Domenico "Rocky" Colavito, Jr. has 1,730 career hits.

In 1965, playing every game, he became the first outfielder in AL history to complete a season with a perfect 1.000 fielding percentage.

On June 10, 1959 he smashed four homers in consecutive at bats in a single game at the Baltimore Orioles' cavernous Memorial Stadium.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 2:37 AM

November 30, 1731, Beijing was hit by an earthquake; about 100,000 die .

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 9:13 AM

Born February 22, 1732 - George Washington, 1st President of the United States, commander in the Revolutionary War, soldier in the French and Indian War (d. 1799)

Congressman Henry Lee, a Revolutionary War comrade and father of the Civil War general Robert E. Lee, famously eulogized Washington as follows:

First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in humble and enduring scenes of private life. Pious, just, humane, temperate, and sincere; uniform, dignified, and commanding; his example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of that example lasting…Correct throughout, vice shuddered in his presence and virtue always felt his fostering hand. The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues…Such was the man for whom our nation mourns.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 10:02 AM

Monon , Indiana had a population of 1,733 at the 2000 census.

The town's name is derived from the names of two creeks nearby, the Big Monon and the Little Monon. The spelling of the name of the creeks was formerly Monong, a Potawatomi word which one authority says meant "swift-running".

Monon was once a growing railroad town with a convergence of several railway lines carrying cargo and passengers throughout major parts of Indiana. The old 11-track yard is now just overgrown foundation.





digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 10:30 AM

Born in 1734, Daniel Boone was an explorer and hunter whose exploits made him one of the most famous frontiersman in American history.

Boone was played by Fess Parker in the children's TV series "Daniel Boone" from 1964-70. The show's theme song described him as "the rippin'est, roarin'est, fightin'est man the frontier ever knew".

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 10:41 AM

Paul Revere, American silversmith and patriot born January 1, 1735 (d. 1818)

Opening lines of Longfellow's poem
The Midnight Ride Of Paul Revere

Listen, my children, and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-Five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year

Longfellow's poem was never designed to be history and there are few serious historians today who would maintain that Revere was anything like the lone-wolf rider portrayed in the poem


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 3:06 PM

Patrick Henry, American patriot was born in 1736.

He is known and remembered for his "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech. Along with Samuel Adams and Thomas Paine, he is remembered as one of the most influential (and radical) advocates of the American Revolution and republicanism, especially in his denunciations of corruption in government officials and his defense of historic rights.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 6:39 PM

1737 John Hancock, American statesman and revolutionary is born
He served as President of the Second Continental Congress and was the first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, but is most famous for his prominent signature on the United States Declaration of Independence.

Thomas Paine, British-born American patriot and pamphleteer is born.
Thomas Paine has a claim to the title The Father of the American Revolution because of Common Sense, the pro-independence monograph pamphlet he anonymously published on January 10, 1776; it quickly spread among the literate, and, in three months, 100,000 copies sold throughout the American British colonies (with only two million free inhabitants), making it a best-selling work in eighteenth-century America. Paine's original title for the pamphlet was Plain Truth; Paine's friend, pro-independence advocate Benjamin Rush, suggested Common Sense instead.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 7:47 PM

Ethan Allen, American patriot was born on Jan. 21, 1738.

In the spring of 1775, following the beginning of the American Revolutionary War, Allen and Benedict Arnold led a raid to capture Fort Ticonderoga.

Ticonderoga was taken from the small British garrison that held it and who were apparently not aware that the war had started. Allen/Arnold's rebels also quickly captured forts at Crown Point, Fort Ann on Isle La Motte near the present Canadian border, and (temporarily) the town of St John (now Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec). The huge stores of cannon and powder seized at Ticonderoga allowed the American rebels to break the stalemate at the siege of Boston, which caused the British to evacuate the city in March 1776.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 14th Nov '08 9:26 PM

In 1739, two women became the first executed in the state of Vermont, both convicted of "'feloniously concealing the death of a ... infant bastard child'". Since then, twenty-four people have been executed, with the last execution carried out in 1939.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 5:38 AM

The most accurate early plan of Stonehenge was made in 1740 by Bath architect John Wood. Importantly Wood’s plan was made before the collapse of the southwest Trilithon (which fell in 1797; restored 1958).

New archaeological evidence found by the Stonehenge Riverside Project indicates that Stonehenge served as a burial ground from its earliest beginnings.The dating of cremated remains found that burials took place as early as 3000 B.C, when the first ditches were being built around the monument. Burials continued at Stonehenge for at least another 500 years when the giant stones which mark the landmark were put up.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 5:43 AM

Benedict Arnold, American Revolutionary War general and traitor was born on January 14, 1741.

Arnold is considered by many to be the best general and most accomplished leader in the Continental Army. Without Arnold's earlier contributions to their cause, the American Revolution might well have been lost; but after he switched sides, his name became a byword for treason in the United States.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 8:35 AM

David Bushnell born in 1742 was an American inventor during the Revolutionary War. He is credited with creating the first submarine ever used in combat. He called it the Turtle because of its look in the water. His idea of using water as ballast for submerging and raising his submarine is still in use today, as is the screw propeller, which was first used in the Turtle.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 11:17 AM

Born April 13, 1743 - Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of the United States

A polymath, Jefferson achieved distinction as, among other things, a horticulturist, statesman, architect, archaeologist, paleontologist, author, inventor, and founder of the University of Virginia. When President John F. Kennedy welcomed forty-nine Nobel Prize winners to the White House in 1962 he said, "I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent and of human knowledge that has ever been gathered together at the White House – with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone." Jefferson has been consistently ranked by scholars as one of the greatest U.S. Presidents.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 12:45 PM

Abigail Adams (née Smith) (born November 11, 1744) was the wife of John Adams, the second President of the United States, and mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth, and is regarded as the first Second Lady of the United States and the second First Lady of the United States though the terms were not coined until after her death.

Adams is remembered for the many letters she wrote to her husband while he stayed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the Continental Congresses. John Adams frequently sought the advice of his wife on many matters, and their letters are filled with intellectual discussions on government and politics. The letters are invaluable eyewitness accounts of the Revolutionary War home front as well as excellent sources of political commentary.





salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 2:42 PM

Founded in 1745 by English & German settlers, Fredericktown, as originally named was established as a frontier town which serviced wagon trains blazing the first trails across the unexplored Allegheny Mountains.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 4:03 PM

Kazimierz Pułaski was born in 1746.

A member of the Polish landed nobility, he was a military commander for the Bar Confederation and fought against Russian domination of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. When this uprising failed, he immigrated to North America, where he became a General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.

He was a noted cavalryman and created Pulaski's Legion, one of the few cavalry regiments in the American Continental Army. He took part in the Battle of Brandywine, the Siege of Charleston (South Carolina), and the Battle of Savannah (Georgia).

through Washington's intervention, Congress approved the establishment of the Cavalry and put Pulaski at its head. The Father of the American Cavalry demanded much of his men and trained them in tested cavalry tactics. He used his own personal finances, when money from Congress was scarce, in order to assure his forces of the finest equipment and personal safety.

He died of wounds suffered in the Battle of Savannah.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 6:28 PM

John Paul Jones, American naval captain was born July 6, 1747. Although he made enemies among the American ruling class, and his career in the Continental Navy never saw him rise above the rank of Captain, his actions in British waters during the Revolution earned him an international reputation which persists to this day.

During his engagement with Serapis, Jones uttered, according to the later recollection of his First Lieutenant, the legendary reply to a quip about surrender from the British captain: "I have not yet begun to fight!"




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 15th Nov '08 11:57 PM

Deacon McGuire had 1,748 hits during his career. His record of playing in 26 major league seasons was unmatched until 1993,

He played for: Toledo Blue Stockings (1884), Detroit Wolverines (1885, 1888) , Philadelphia Quakers (1886-1888) ,Cleveland Blues (1888) ,Rochester Broncos (1890),
Washington Statesmen/Senators (1892-1899),Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1901),Detroit Tigers (1902-1903, 1912), New York Highlanders (1904-1907),
Boston Americans/Red Sox (1907-1908) and the Clevland Naps (1908, 1910)


lucimoore
Lucimoore  (Level: 183.4 - Posts: 1684)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 1:00 AM

Winstanley College in Wigan, Greater Manchester has 1,749 full time students for this 2008 academic year.

resolsufoolps
Resolsufoolps  (Level: 20.7 - Posts: 95)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 1:10 AM

1750 Pennsylvania Avenue is a 259,355 square foot property -- located in the heart of the Central Business District -- one block from the White House. It is surrounded by world-class restaurants, shops and services. 1750 Pennsylvania Avenue epitomizes Washington, D.C.'s professional community.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 3:21 AM

James Madison, fourth president of the United States, (1809–1817) was born in 1751.

Madison's distinctive contribution to the colonial cause was a deep knowledge and understanding of government and political philosophy—resources that first proved their value in 1776 when Madison helped draft a constitution for the new state of Virginia.

He served in the Continental Congress (1780–83, 1787) and represented his county in the Virginia legislature (1784–86), where he played a prominent part in disestablishing the Anglican Church.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 6:28 AM

1752

September 1 - The Liberty Bell arrives in Philadelphia.

January 1 - Betsy Ross, American entrepreneur is born. She is best remembered as a flag maker during the Revolution. Family oral history, supported only by 19th century affidavits, recounts the widowed Ross meeting with George Washington, George Ross, and Robert Morris at her upholstery business in Philadelphia, a meeting said to have resulted in the sewing of the first U.S. "stars and stripes" flag. According to the story, it was at this meeting, to "silence the men's protests that these new five-pointed stars would be unfamiliar and difficult for seamstresses to make, she folded a piece of paper, made a single scissor snip, and revealed a perfect five-pointed star."

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 9:06 AM

In 1754, George Washington was commissioned as a lieutenant colonel and ordered him to lead an expedition to Fort Duquesne in the Ohio Country to drive out the French. With his American Indian allies led by Tanacharison, Washington and his troops ambushed a French scouting party of some 30 men, led by Joseph Coulon de Jumonville. Washington and his troops were overwhelmed at Fort Necessity by a larger and better positioned French and Indian force. The terms of surrender included a statement that Washington had assassinated Jumonville after the ambush. Washington could not read French, and, unaware of what it said, signed his name. Released by the French, Washington returned to Virginia, where he was cleared of blame for the defeat, but resigned because he did not like the new arrangement of the Virginia Militia.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 3:03 PM

1755 Birth
January 11 - Alexander Hamilton, first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury He was the first United States Secretary of the Treasury, a Founding Father, economist, and political philosopher. He led calls for the Philadelphia Convention, was one of America's first Constitutional lawyers, and cowrote the Federalist Papers, a primary source for Constitutional interpretation.


June 6 - Nathan Hale, American Revolutionary War captain, writer and patriot Hale was an officer for the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Widely considered America's first spy, he volunteered for an intelligence-gathering mission, but was captured by the British. He is best remembered for his speech before being hanged following the Battle of Long Island, in which he reportedly said, "I only regret that I have but one life to give my country.


salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 6:22 PM

catching up --

1753 - The Town of Shirley, Mass., was founded. It is located west of Boston and north of Worcester. Since the founding of the Town of Shirley, Mass., in 1753, Shirley’s Historic Meetinghouse has played an intricate part of the town’s life. Now maintained as a living historic site by dedicated volunteers, the Meetinghouse continues to provide a place where people can come together to share important events and the love of music.



salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 6:29 PM

back on track ...

1756

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born Jan. 27, 1756. Mozart was born in Salzburg into a musical family. When he was five years old, he could both read and write music and had precocious skills as a keyboard and violin player. Much of his childhood and adolescence was taken up with tours, which included performances before many of the royal courts of Europe.

.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 8:36 PM

Thanks for getting back on track

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,757 families residing in Ishpeming, Michigan.

The name Ishpeming comes from the Anishinaabe language ishpiming, meaning "on top" or "from above" or "upon high." Ishpeming, in the Ojibwa dialect of the Anishinaabe language, also means "Heaven".

Ishpeming is considered the birthplace of organized skiing in the United States and is the home to the National Ski Hall of Fame.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 9:20 PM

Born in 1758

April 28 - James Monroe, 5th President of the United States
His administration was marked by the acquisition of Florida; the Missouri Compromise, in which Missouri was declared a slave state; the admission of Maine in 1820 as a free state; and the profession of the Monroe Doctrine, declaring U.S. opposition to European interference in the Americas, as well as breaking all ties with France remaining from the War of 1812.

October 16 Noah Webster, U.S. lexicographer
In the United States his name became synonymous with "dictionary", especially the modern Merriam-Webster dictionary that was first published in 1828 as An American Dictionary of the English Language.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Sun, 16th Nov '08 11:00 PM

Born 25 January 1759, Robert "Rabbie" Burns is Scotland's most famous poet and the author of "Auld Lang Syne".

Despite his early death at the age of 37 Burns produced a large body of work and is credited with collecting, revising and adapting hundreds of traditional songs and his original poems brought international attention to the Scottish language.
Burn's fans around the world remember him with the annual "Burns Supper" held on his birthday.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 2:24 AM

There are 1,760 yards in a mile.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 6:20 AM

By 1761 all the fighting of the French and Indian War in North America had concluded. The Paris Treaty two years later ceded all the French land east of the Mississippi to England.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 9:14 AM

Pygmalion was a short play written in 1762 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau. A novel feature of the work was the use of instrumental musical interludes; because of this, it is sometimes considered the first example of a melodrama.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 10:14 AM

1763 -- July 17 - John Jacob Astor, German-born entrepreneur, was born

chyenn
Chyenn  (Level: 202.6 - Posts: 1332)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 11:26 AM

The Sugar Act
also Titled The American Revenue Act of 1764

On April 5, 1764, Parliament passed a modified version of the Sugar and Molasses Act (1733), which was about to expire. Under the Molasses Act colonial merchants had been required to pay a tax of six pence per gallon on the importation of foreign molasses. .....The Sugar Act reduced the rate of tax on molasses from six pence to three pence per gallon, while Grenville took measures that the duty be strictly enforced. The act also listed more foreign goods to be taxed including sugar, certain wines, coffee, pimiento, cambric and printed calico, and further, regulated the export of lumber and iron. The enforced tax on molasses caused the almost immediate decline in the rum industry in the colonies. The combined effect of the new duties was to sharply reduce the trade with Madeira, the Azores, the Canary Islands, and the French West Indies (Guadelupe, Martinique and Santo Domingo (now Haiti)), all important destination ports for lumber, flour, cheese, and assorted farm products. The situation disrupted the colonial economy by reducing the markets to which the colonies could sell, and the amount of currency available to them for the purchase of British manufactured goods. This act, and the Currency Act, set the stage for the revolt at the imposition of the Stamp Act.

http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/related/sugaract.htm

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 3:13 PM

1765

The Sons of Liberty is founded in Boston, Massachusetts

The British Parliament enacts the Stamp Act on the 13 colonies, in order to help pay for British military operations in North America.

The first chocolate factory in the United States (Dorchester, Massachusetts) is established by Dr. James Baker.

Eli Whitney, American inventor is born

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 3:39 PM

Barbara Fritchie was born on December 3, 1766. She was an American patriot during the Civil War.

is the subject of John Greenleaf Whittier's poem of 1864, Barbara Frietchie. When Winston Churchill passed through Frederick in 1943, he stopped at the house and recited the poem from memory, an excerpt of which follows.

"Shoot, if you must, this old gray head,
But spare your country's flag," she said.
A shade of sadness, a blush of shame,
Over the face of the leader came;
The nobler nature within him stirred
To life at that woman's deed and word;
"Who touches a hair of yon gray head
Dies like a dog! March on!" he said.





tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 5:58 PM

The Townshend Acts (1767) represented the continued efforts of Parliament to place a portion of the large debt incurred by French and Indian War on the American colonies where it had been fought. However, the Acts provoked only further outrage among American colonists and helped spark the Liberty seizure and riots of 1768, their opposition best stated by the phrase "No taxation without representation" originally spoken by James Otis.

Kunta Kinte, ancestor of author Alex Haley (Roots), arrives in Annapolis, Maryland on board a slave ship.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 6:16 PM

1768

Samuel Adams's circular letter is issued by the Massachusetts House of Representatives and sent to the other Thirteen Colonies. Refusal to revoke the letter will result in the occupation of Boston by the British Army.

The Massachusetts Assembly is dissolved for refusing to assist in the collection of taxes.

Boston citizens refuse to quarter British troops

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 7:26 PM

Ontonagon, Michigan had a total population of 1,769 as of the 2000 census, the village .

Ontonagon is located on the far western edge of the Eastern Time Zone, in the summer the sun sets over Lake Superior at 10pm local time with dusk lasting until almost 11pm. By contrast in the winter the sun does not rise until just before 9am and it is still pitch black at 8am.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 17th Nov '08 9:57 PM

March 5 - Boston Massacre: Five Americans are shot by British troops in an event that helps start the American Revolutionary War 5 years later.
The Boston Massacre is one of several events that turned colonial sentiment against British rule. Each of these events followed a pattern of Britain asserting its control, and the colonists chafing under the increased regulation. While it took five years from the Massacre to outright revolution, it foreshadowed the violent rebellion to come. It also demonstrated how British authority galvanized colonial opposition and protest.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 2:13 AM

Left off the year

March 5, 1770 - Boston Massacre: Five Americans are shot by British troops in an event that helps start the American Revolutionary War 5 years later.
The Boston Massacre is one of several events that turned colonial sentiment against British rule. Each of these events followed a pattern of Britain asserting its control, and the colonists chafing under the increased regulation. While it took five years from the Massacre to outright revolution, it foreshadowed the violent rebellion to come. It also demonstrated how British authority galvanized colonial opposition and protest.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 7:14 AM

1771 – Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot's second steam-powered vehicle is widely believed to have crashed into a wall during a test run, in what would have been the first automobile accident.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 7:30 AM

1772 American Revolutionary War: Samuel Adams and Joseph Warren form the first Committee of Correspondence.

The committees of correspondence rallied opposition on common causes and established plans for collective action, and so the group of committees was the beginning of what later became a formal political union among the colonies.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 8:35 AM

December 16, 1773 - The Boston Tea Party was an act of direct action protest by the American colonists against the British Government in which they destroyed many crates of tea belonging to the British East India Company on ships in Boston Harbor. The incident has been seen as helping to spark the American Revolution and remains to this day one of the most iconic events in American history.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 9:55 AM

1774

September 21 - George Mason and George Washington found the Fairfax County Militia Association, a military unit independent of British control.

October 21 - First display of the word "Liberty" on a flag, raised by colonists in Taunton, Massachusetts and which was in defiance of British rule in Colonial America.


German cobbler Johann Birkenstock creates the first Birkenstock sandals.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 11:26 AM

1775
March 23 - Patrick Henry delivers his "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia.

April 18 - Paul Revere, William Dawes, and Joseph Warren ride from Boston to Concord in an attempt to warn John Hancock and Sam Adams that the British armies are coming to seize their weapons and ammunition.

April 19 - American Revolution: Hostility between Britain and its American colonies explodes into bloodshed at the Battles of Lexington and Concord on the 19th, which ignites the American Revolution.

July 3 - American Revolution: George Washington takes command of the 17,000-man Continental Army at Cambridge.

July 6 - The Continental Congress issues Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms, which contains the words: "Our cause is just. Our union is perfect... being with one mind resolved to die freemen rather than to live slaves...".

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 1:28 PM

"1776" the Broadway musical and later a film which tells the story of the events that lead to the signing of The Declaration of Independence.

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 1:42 PM

1776 (July 4th) Declaration of Independence

(August 27-29) Washington suffers a severe defeat at the hands of General Howe in The Battle of Long Island.

(October 11 ) Battle of Valcour Bay - 83 US gunships crippled.

(October 28 ) Washington suffers more heavy casualties in the Battle of White Plain.




wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 1:47 PM

1777 is a Non-Emergency Private Ambulance Operator in Singapore.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 3:13 PM

1777 -
January 15 - Vermont declares its independence from New York, becoming an independent country, a status it retains until it joins the United States as the 14th state in 1791.

June 13 - American Revolution: The Marquis de Lafayette lands near Charleston, South Carolina to help the Continental Congress train its army.

June 14 - The Stars and Stripes is adopted by the Continental Congress as the Flag of the United States.

December 19 - American Revolution: George Washington's Continental Army goes into winter quarters at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.




townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 3:29 PM

1778 -
February 23 - American Revolutionary War: Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben arrives at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania and begins to train the American troops.

July 10 - American Revolutionary War: Louis XVI of France declares war on the Kingdom of Great Britain.

September 19 - The Continental Congress passes the first budget of the United States.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 5:24 PM

1779
June 1 - American Revolutionary War: Benedict Arnold is court-martialed for malfeasance in his treatment of government property.
June 16 - American Revolutionary War: In support of the U.S., Spain declares war on England.
August 1 - Francis Scott Key, American lawyer and lyricist is born

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 18th Nov '08 11:51 PM

1780 May 12 - American Revolutionary War: Charleston, South Carolina is taken by British forces.

July 11 - French soldiers arrive in Newport, Rhode Island to reinforce colonists in the American Revolutionary War

October 7 - American Revolutionary War - Battle of Kings Mountain: Patriots defeat Loyalists under British Major Patrick Ferguson.

New England's Dark Day refers to an event which occurred on 19 May 1780, when an unusual darkening of the day sky was observed over the New England states and parts of Canada. The primary cause of the event is believed to have been a combination of smoke from forest fires, a thick fog, and cloud cover. The darkness was so complete that candles were required from noon until midnight and did not disperse until the middle of the next night

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 19th Nov '08 4:09 PM

The Siege of Yorktown or Battle of Yorktown in 1781 was a decisive victory by a combined assault of American forces led by General George Washington and French forces led by General Comte de Rochambeau over a British Army commanded by General Lord Cornwallis. It proved to be the last major land battle of the American Revolutionary War, as the surrender of Cornwallis’s army prompted the British government to eventually negotiate an end to the conflict. Over 7,000 British troops became prisoners of the American forces.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 20th Nov '08 4:33 AM

1782

August 7 - George Washington orders the creation of the Badge of Military Merit (or the Order of the Purple Heart) to honor soldiers' merit in battle (reinstated later by Franklin D. Roosevelt and renamed to the more poetic "Purple Heart" to honor soldiers wounded in action).

November 30 - In Paris, representatives from the United States and the Kingdom of Great Britain sign preliminary peace articles (later formalized in the Treaty of Paris).

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 20th Nov '08 5:06 AM

February 3, 1783 - Britain recognizes United States independence.

November 2, 1783 - In Rocky Hill, New Jersey, US General George Washington gives his Farewell Address to the Army.

June 8 - The volcano Laki, in Iceland, begins an 8-month eruption which kills 9,350 people and starts a 7-year famine.
The consequences for Iceland -- known as the Mist Hardships -- were catastrophic. An estimated 20-25% of the population died in the famine and fluorine poisoning after the fissure eruptions ceased. Around 80% of sheep, 50% of cattle and 50% of horses died because of dental and skeletal fluorosis from the 8 million tons of fluorine that were released
In North America, the winter of 1784 was the longest and one of the coldest on record. It was the longest period of below-zero temperatures in New England, the largest accumulation of snow in New Jersey, and the longest freezing over of Chesapeake Bay. There was ice skating in Charleston Harbor, a huge snowstorm hit the south, the Mississippi River froze at New Orleans, and there was ice in the Gulf of Mexico.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 20th Nov '08 2:27 PM

In 1784, following the peace treaty that ended the American Revolutionary War, the name of Tryon County, New York was changed to Montgomery County to honor the general, Richard Montgomery, who had captured several places in Canada and died attempting to capture the city of Quebec, replacing the name of the hated British governor.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 20th Nov '08 6:50 PM

July 6, 1785 - The dollar is unanimously chosen as the money unit for the United States (the first time a nation has adopted a decimal coinage system.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 20th Nov '08 8:31 PM

August 17, 1786 - David "Davy" Crockett, American frontiersman is born

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 20th Nov '08 11:51 PM

May 25, 1787 - In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, delegates begin to convene a Constitutional Convention intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. However, a new Constitution for the United States is eventually produced. George Washington presides over the Convention.

September 17 - The United States Constitution is adopted by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

December 7 - Delaware ratifies the Constitution and becomes the first U.S. state.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 21st Nov '08 6:20 AM

On June 5, 1788, Patrick Henry spoke before Virginia's ratification convention in opposition to the Constitution: "Is it necessary for your liberty that you should abandon those great rights by the adoption of this system? Is the relinquishment of the trial by jury and the liberty of the press necessary for your liberty? Will the abandonment of your most sacred rights tend to the security of your liberty? Liberty, the greatest of all earthly blessings—give us that precious jewel, and you may take every thing else!"

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 21st Nov '08 1:28 PM

January 7 - 1789 United States presidential elections and House of Representatives elections are held.
February 4 - George Washington is unanimously elected the first President of the United States by the United States Electoral College.
July 14 - The French Revolution (1789-1799) begins: Citizens of Paris storm the Bastille and free seven prisoners. In rural areas, peasants attack noble manors.
September 25 - The United States Congress proposes a set of 12 amendments for ratification by the states. Ratification for 10 of these proposals is completed on December 5, 1791, creating the United States Bill of Rights.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 21st Nov '08 3:44 PM

May 29, 1790 - Rhode Island ratifies the United States Constitution and becomes the last of the 13 original states to do so.

April 17 - Ben Franklin dies at age 84.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Fri, 21st Nov '08 4:26 PM

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart died in 1791, at age 35, of kidney failure during an influenza epidemic in Vienna.

His friend Joseph Haydn wrote "Posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years". Others claim that, more than two centuries after his death, his talent remains unsurpassed.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 21st Nov '08 8:43 PM

July 18, 1792 - John Paul Jones, American naval captain dies in Paris, France.

In 1905, Jones' remains were returned to the United States and re-interred at the Naval Academy Chapel in Annapolis.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 21st Nov '08 8:58 PM

In 1793 Eli Whitney applied for a patent for his cotton gin.

Whitney is most famous for two innovations which later divided the United States in the mid-19th century: the cotton gin, and his advocacy of interchangeable parts. In the South, the cotton gin revolutionized the way cotton was harvested and reinvigorated slavery. While in the North, the adoption of interchangeable parts revolutionized the manufacturing industry, and in time contributed greatly to their victory in the Civil War

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 1:15 AM

July 5 - Sylvester Graham, American nutritionist and inventor was born. He was an early advocate of dietary reform in United States

He conceived the Graham Cracker of as a health food as part of the Graham Diet, a regimen to suppress what he considered unhealthy carnal urges, the source of many maladies according to Graham.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 9:30 AM

Forgot the year

July 5, 1794 - Sylvester Graham, American nutritionist and inventor was born. He was an early advocate of dietary reform in United States

He conceived the Graham Cracker of as a health food as part of the Graham Diet, a regimen to suppress what he considered unhealthy carnal urges, the source of many maladies according to Graham.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 9:43 AM

1795 - The Treaty of Greenville was signed at Fort Greenville (now Greenville, Ohio) between a coalition of Native Americans and the United States following the Native American loss at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. It put an end to the Northwest Indian War. The United States was represented by General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, who defeated the Native Americans at Fallen Timbers. In exchange for goods to the value of $20,000 (such as blankets, utensils, and domestic animals), the Native Americans turned over to the United States large parts of modern-day Ohio, the future site of Chicago, and the Fort Detroit area.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 10:16 AM

Horace Mann, born in 1796, was an American education reformer.

The six main problems he targeted were:
(1) the public should no longer remain ignorant and free (this is the reason a popular education is important),
(2) that such education should be paid for, controlled, and sustained by an interested public;
(3) that this education will be best provided in schools that embrace children of all diversities;
(4) that this education must be free of religious influence;
(5) that this education must be taught by the spirit, methods, and discipline of a free society; and
that education should be provided by well-trained, professional teachers.

To sum it all up, Horace Mann worked effectively for more and better equipped school houses, longer school years (until 16 years old), higher pay for teachers, and a wider curriculum.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 2:43 PM

March 4, 1797 - John Adams succeeds George Washington as the President of the United States of America.
Learned and thoughtful, John Adams was more remarkable as a political philosopher than as a politician.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 3:31 PM

Ted Williams scored 1,798 runs in his career.

He is widely considered to be one of the greatest hitters in the history of baseball. Williams was a two-time American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner, led the league in batting six times, and won the Triple Crown twice. He is the last player in Major League Baseball to bat over .400 in a single season (.406 in 1941). Williams holds the highest career batting average of anyone with 500 or more home runs.






loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 22nd Nov '08 4:36 PM

June 6, 1799 - Patrick Henry, American revolutionary politician. He is perhaps best known for the speech he made in the House of Burgesses on March 23, 1775, urging the legislature to take military action against the encroaching British military force. he ended his speech with his most famous words:
Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

December 14 - George Washington, the first President of the United States, dies in Mount Vernon, Virginia
During the United States Bicentennial year, George Washington was posthumously appointed to the grade of General of the Armies of The United States. This restored Washington's position as the highest ranking military officer in U.S. history, which had been undone when General John J. Pershing was made General of the Armies at the end of World War I

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 23rd Nov '08 8:06 AM

In the United States Presidential election of 1800, Vice President Thomas Jefferson defeated President John Adams.

The election exposed one of the flaws in the original Constitution. Members of the Electoral College could only vote for President; each elector could vote for two candidates, and the Vice President was the person who received the second largest number of votes during the election. The Democratic-Republicans had planned for one of the electors to abstain from casting his second vote for Aaron Burr, which would have led to Jefferson receiving one electoral vote more than Burr. The plan, however, was bungled, resulting in a tied electoral vote between Jefferson and Burr. The election was then put into the hands of the outgoing House of Representatives controlled by the Federalist Party. Most Federalists voted for Burr in order to block Jefferson from the Presidency, and the result was a week of deadlock. Federalist Alexander Hamilton, who detested both but preferred Jefferson to Burr, intervened on Jefferson's behalf, which allowed Jefferson to ascend to the Presidency. Hamilton's actions were one cause of his duel with Burr, which resulted in Hamilton's death in 1804.

The Twelfth Amendment, ratified in 1804, was added to the United States Constitution. The Twelfth Amendment stipulates that electors make a distinct choice between their selections for President and Vice President.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 2:18 AM

1801 - Joseph-Marie Jacquard develops a loom where the pattern being woven is controlled by punch cards.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 6:04 AM

1802 - William Symington builds the first successful steamship, the Charlotte Dundas.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 1:21 PM

January 30, 1803 - Monroe and Livingston sail for Paris to discuss, and possibly buy, New Orleans; they end completing the Louisiana Purchase.

April 30 - Louisiana Purchase is made by the United States from France.

July 4 - The Louisiana Purchase is announced to the American people.



maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 2:25 PM

1804

May 14 - The Lewis and Clark Expedition departs from Camp Dubois and begins their historic journey by traveling up the Missouri River.

August 20 - Lewis and Clark Expedition: The Corps of Discovery, whose purpose is to explore the Louisiana Purchase, suffers its only death when Sergeant Charles Floyd dies, apparently from acute appendicitis.



billkozy
Billkozy  (Level: 280.1 - Posts: 308)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 6:18 PM

1805: the number of people in Oakfield, NY according to the 2000 census.

Also, the number of unaccounted American troops from the Vietam War.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 7:43 PM

March 23, 1806 - After traveling through the Louisiana Purchase and reaching the Pacific Ocean, explorers Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery begin their journey home.

September 23, 1806 - The Lewis and Clark Expedition reaches St. Louis, Missouri, ending a successful exploration of the Louisiana Territory and the Pacific Northwest.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 24th Nov '08 8:57 PM

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was born in 1807. He was an American educator and poet whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and "Evangeline".

In 1884 he was the first non-British writer for whom a commemorative sculpted bust was placed in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey in London; he remains the only American poet represented with a bust.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 5:52 AM

1808 - Anthracite coal is first burned as fuel by Jesse Fell in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; the discovery leads to the use of coal as the key fuel source of America's industrial revolution.

He served as Abraham Lincoln's campaign manager in Lincoln's 1858 race for the US Senate. Democratic Party's presidential candidate in 1952 and 1956, Adlai E. Stevenson II was his great-grandson.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 7:10 AM

1809 - Congress passes the Non-Intercourse Act. This Act lifted all embargoes on American shipping except for those bound for British or French ports. The intent was to damage the economies of the United Kingdom and France. Like its predecessor, the Embargo Act, it was mostly ineffective, and contributed to the coming of the War of 1812.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 4:18 PM

The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. It was conducted on August 6, 1810. It showed that 7,239,881 people were living in the United States of which 1,191,362 were slaves.



maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 4:22 PM

1811 - Luddite uprisings begin in northern England and the Midlands.

The Luddites were a social movement of British textile artisans in the early nineteenth century who protested—often by destroying mechanized looms—against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution, which they felt threatened their livelihood.

In recent years, the terms Luddism and Luddite or Neo-Luddism and Neo-Luddite have become synonymous with anyone who opposes the advance of technology due to the cultural and socioeconomic changes that are associated with it.



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 7:18 PM

The Waltz was first introduced into English ballrooms in 1812.

When the waltz was first introduced it met with outrage! People were shocked to see a man dancing with his hand on a lady's waist! So different from the stately dances of the aristocracy, the waltz was considered to be a wicked and improper dance! But it gained popularity and quickly became one of the most popular dances of all.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 7:40 PM

1813 - War of 1812 - Battle of Lake Erie: An American squadron under Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry defeats a British squadron, capturing 6 ships.

During the battle Perry's flagship the Lawrence was destroyed and Perry rowed a half-mile through heavy gunfire to transfer command to the Niagara, carrying his battle flag which read "DONT GIVE UP THE SHIP" [sic], the famous final words of Captain James Lawrence. His battle report after victory is famous: "We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop".


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 25th Nov '08 8:10 PM

1814

September 13 – War of 1812: The British bombard Fort McHenry at Baltimore. The British failure at the Battle of Baltimore is a turning point in the war, and the American defense of the fort inspires Francis Scott Key to compose the poem later set to music as The Star Spangled Banner.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 2:35 AM

Ada Lovelace was born in 1815. Born Augusta Ada Byron, she was the only legitimate child of Lord Byron.

She is mainly known for having written a description of Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. She is today appreciated as the "first programmer" since she was writing programs — that is, manipulating symbols according to rules—for a machine that Babbage had not yet built. She also foresaw the capability of computers to go beyond mere calculating or number-crunching while others, including Babbage himself, focused only on these capabilities.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 2:26 PM

The Year Without a Summer was 1816, in which severe summer climate abnormalities destroyed crops in Northern Europe, the American Northeast and eastern Canada. Historian John D. Post has called this "the last great subsistence crisis in the Western world". It appears to have been caused by a volcanic winter.

In May 1816 frost killed off most of the crops that had been planted, and in June two large snowstorms in eastern Canada and New England resulted in many human deaths. Nearly a foot of snow was observed in Quebec City in early June, with consequent additional loss of crops—most summer growing plants have cell walls which rupture in a mild frost, let alone a snowstorm coating the soils. The result was widespread localized famines, and further deaths from those who, in a hunger-weakened state, then succumbed to disease.

Grain prices rose dramatically. Oats, for example, rose from 12¢ a bushel the previous year to 92¢ a bushel nearly eight times as much—and oats are a necessary staple for an economy dependent upon horses for primary transportation. Those areas suffering local crop failures then had to deal with the lack of roads in the early 19th century, preventing any easy importation of bulky food stuffs.




maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 3:38 PM

Henry David Thoreau was born in 1817. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

Thoreau’s writings had far reaching influences on many public figures. Political leaders and reformers like Mahatma Gandhi, President John F. Kennedy, civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr., Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, and Russian author Leo Tolstoy all spoke of being strongly affected by Thoreau’s work, particularly Civil Disobedience.

cakey123
Cakey123  (Level: 102.5 - Posts: 4)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 5:34 PM

I'm new to this but I think I get the idea?!

Emily Bronte was born on July 30, 1818. She is perhaps best remembered for the classic novel 'Wuthering Heights' which was published under the pen-name Currer Bell. Emily was the middle of the Bronte sisters being younger than Charlotte but older than Anne.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 5:35 PM

1818

April 4 - The U.S. Congress adopts the flag of the United States as having 13 red and white stripes and one star for each state (20 stars) with additional stars to be added whenever a new state is added to the Union.

May 10 - Paul Revere, American patriot and silversmith dies

October 5 - Nancy Hanks, mother of Abraham Lincoln dies

October 20 - A convention between the U.S. and the United Kingdom establishes the northern boundary as the 49th parallel from the Lake of the Woods to the Rocky Mountains, also creating the Northwest Angle.

December 13 - Mary Todd Lincoln, First Lady of the United States is born




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 8:52 PM

Welcome Cakey

Walter Whitman, born 1819, was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist.

His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality.



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Wed, 26th Nov '08 11:08 PM

King George lll of England died in 1820.

He suffered from recurring bouts of mental illness which eventually became permanent and over Christmas of 1819 he spoke nonsense for 58 hours before falling into a coma. He died blind, deaf and insane at the age of 82 having reigned for 60 years, longer than any other monarch at that time.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 27th Nov '08 6:42 AM

In 1821 Catholepistemiad of Michigania's name was changed to the University of Michigan.

The unwieldy name of the Catholepistemiad and its constituent departments made it a target of ridicule. Governor Cass referred to it as the "Cathole-what's its name" and thought it a "pedantic and uncouth name," while Justice James V. Campbell said it was "neither Greek, Latin, nor English, [but merely] a piece of language gone mad." On April 30, 1821, Governor Cass and Judges Griffin and James Witherell passed a new act that changed the name of the institution to the University of Michigan

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 27th Nov '08 9:07 AM

In 1822, Charles Babbage proposed the use of a Difference Engine in a paper to the Royal Astronomical Society on 14 June entitled "Note on the application of machinery to the computation of astronomical and mathematical tables"

This machine used the decimal number system and was powered by cranking a handle. The British government initially financed the project, but withdrew funding when Babbage repeatedly asked for more money whilst making no apparent progress on building the machine.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 27th Nov '08 10:59 AM

The Monroe Doctrine is a U.S. doctrine which, in 1823, stated that European powers were no longer to colonize or interfere with the affairs of the newly independent states of the Americas. The United States would not interfere with existing colonies or their dependencies in the Western Hemisphere. However, any attempt by a European nation to oppress or control any nation in the western hemisphere would be seen as an act of aggression and the United States would intervene.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 27th Nov '08 3:06 PM

In the United States presidential election of 1824, John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825, after the election was decided by the House of Representatives.

This presidential election was also the only one in which the candidate receiving the most electoral votes did not become president (because a majority, not just a plurality, is required to win).

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 27th Nov '08 6:49 PM

1825 - George Pickett, American Confederate general is born. He is best remembered for his participation in the futile and bloody assault at the Battle of Gettysburg that bears his name, Pickett's Charge.

Pickett had difficulty seeking amnesty after the Civil War. This was a problem shared by other former Confederate officers who had been West Point graduates and had resigned their commissions at the start of the war. Former Union officers, including Ulysses S. Grant, supported pardoning Pickett, but it was not until one year prior to his death that George Pickett received a full pardon by Act of Congress (June 23, 1874).



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 28th Nov '08 3:00 AM

On July 4 1826, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson die.

On the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, Adams died at his home in Quincy. His last words are often quoted as "Jefferson lives." Only the word "Jefferson" was clearly intelligible, however, Adams was unaware that Jefferson, his compatriot in their quest for independence, then great political rival, then later friend and correspondent, had died a few hours earlier on the very same day.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 28th Nov '08 6:22 AM

Edgar Allan Poe was first published in 1827 with an anonymous collection of poems, Tamerlane and Other Poems, credited only to "a Bostonian".

Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story and is considered the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction.


cakey123
Cakey123  (Level: 102.5 - Posts: 4)
Fri, 28th Nov '08 1:47 PM

The French author Jules Gabriel Verne was born on February 8, 1828. Verne is best known for novels Around The World In Eighty Days and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea. Along with H.G. Wells, he is often referred to as the 'Father of Science Fiction'.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 28th Nov '08 3:42 PM

1829 - Stephenson's locomotive The Rocket wins The Rainhill Trials.

The locomotive averaged 12 mph in the trials and hit a top speed of 30 mph while hauling 13 tons. The Stephensons were accordingly given the contract to produce locomotives for the Liverpool & Manchester Railway.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 28th Nov '08 4:23 PM

1830 - Emily Dickinson was born. She was an American poet.

Dickinson was a prolific private poet, though fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time.

Emily Dickinson is now considered a powerful and persistent figure in American culture. Although much of the early reception concentrated on Dickinson's eccentric and secluded nature, she has become widely acknowledged as an innovative pre-modernist poet.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 28th Nov '08 8:05 PM

The John Bull is an English-built railroad steam locomotive that operated in the United States. It was built in England and operated for the first time in the United States in 1831.

The original John Bull is housed and displayed at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 29th Nov '08 4:55 AM

The Black Hawk War of 1832 resulted in the deaths of 70 settlers and soldiers, and hundreds of Black Hawk's band. As well as the combat casualties of the war, a relief force under General Winfield Scott suffered hundreds dead and deserted. The war also resulted in the settlement of Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin.

The war provided a boost to several political careers. Besides the notable involvement of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, four Illinois governors served during the war. The conflict also helped in the political careers of a future governor in both Michigan and Nebraska as well as boosting at least 7 U.S. Senators.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 29th Nov '08 8:20 AM

Harvey Kuenn played in 1833 games during his career.

In 1953, he hit .308 with 94 runs and led the major leagues with 209 hits, setting a major league rookie record with 167 singles. He received the American League Rookie of the Year. Also in that season, he received the first of his eight consecutive selections to the All-Star Game.

Kuenn had the dubious distinction of making the final out in two of Sandy Koufax's four career no-hitters—in 1963 and 1965.

Kuenn was activated by the Brewers for the last two weeks of 1971, in order for him to qualify for pension purposes. He did not play in an actual game, however.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 29th Nov '08 2:37 PM

In 1834, all of the lands acquired in the Louisiana Purchase that were as yet unallocated and lay east of the Missouri River (generally, the Dakotas, Iowa and the western half of Minnesota) were attached to the Michigan Territory, an area that was officially characterized as "north of Missouri and east of the Missouri and White Earth Rivers." At this point, Michigan Territory included what is now the states of Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and a large portion of the Dakotas.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 30th Nov '08 9:07 AM

1835 - Mark Twain, American author and humorist is born.

Twain enjoyed immense public popularity, and his keen wit and incisive satire earned him praise from both critics and peers. American author William Faulkner called Twain "the father of American literature"

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 30th Nov '08 3:35 PM

1836 - After a thirteen day siege The Battle of the Alamo ends; 189 Texans are slaughtered by about 1,600 Mexicans.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 1st Dec '08 12:02 AM

On January 26, 1837, Michigan became the 26th state of the Union.

Two years earlier the federal government had enacted a law that would have created a State of Michigan. A territorial dispute erupted with Ohio over the Toledo Strip, a stretch of land including the city of Toledo, delaying the final accession of statehood. The disputed zone became part of Ohio by the order of a revised bill passed by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Andrew Jackson which also gave compensation to Michigan in the form of control of the Upper Peninsula.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 1st Dec '08 7:41 AM

1838 - John Wilkes Booth, American actor and assassin is born.



digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Mon, 1st Dec '08 2:06 PM

1839 - A Scottish blacksmith, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, invented the first pedal bicycle.

His machine was propelled by pedals, cranks and drive rods and made it possible, for the first time, for a person to travel under his own power faster than he could run.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 1st Dec '08 3:51 PM

The Great Raid of 1840 was the largest Indian raid on white cities in the history of what is now the United States—though technically when it occurred it was in the Republic of Texas and not in the United States.

The war party literally burned one city to the ground. They stole over 3,000 horses and mules, and hundreds of thousands of dollars of other plunder, ranging from silver to cloth and mirrors. Unfortunately for the war party, the sheer volume of loot slowed them down, and made them vulnerable to attack from a militia that otherwise would never have caught them. Equally, the militia missed an opportunity to destroy the bulk of the raiding party when they concentrated on recovering and dividing the recovered bullion and other plunder.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 1st Dec '08 9:13 PM

1841 - President William Henry Harrison dies of pneumonia, becoming the first President of the United States to die in office and at one month, the elected president with the shortest term served. He is succeeded by Vice President John Tyler, who becomes the 10th President of the United States.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 2nd Dec '08 11:05 AM

Isle Royale, Michigan cede by the Ojibwas to the U. S. in the 1842 Treaty of La Pointe.

There are no roads on the island, and, in fact, no wheeled vehicles or devices, other than wheelchairs, are permitted.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 2nd Dec '08 4:19 PM

1843 - May 22 - The first major wagon train headed for the American Northwest sets out with one thousand pioneers from Elm Grove, Missouri on the Oregon Trail.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 2nd Dec '08 8:04 PM

1844 - The first electrical telegram is sent by Samuel F. B. Morse from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. to the B&O Railroad "outer depot" in Baltimore, Maryland, saying "What hath God wrought".


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 2:38 AM

December 2, 1845 - Manifest Destiny: U.S. President James K. Polk announces to Congress that the Monroe Doctrine should be strictly enforced and that the United States should aggressively expand into the West.

Manifest Destiny is the belief that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific Ocean. Sometimes Manifest Destiny was interpreted so widely as to include the eventual absorption of all North America: Canada, Mexico, Cuba and Central America.

Some commentators believe that aspects of Manifest Destiny, particularly the belief in an American "mission" to promote and defend democracy throughout the world, continues to have an influence on American political ideology.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 11:07 AM

1846 - May 13 - Mexican-American War: The United States declares war on Mexico.

June 10 - Mexican-American War: The California Republic declares independence from Mexico.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 11:27 AM

The worst year of the Great Irish Famine was 1847. It is referred to as Black 47. It is estimated that 20 percent of the Irish population died of hunger or disease due to the famine. In addition, in excess of one million Irish emigrated to Great Britain, United States, Canada, Australia, and elsewhere.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 1:23 PM

1848 - Mexican–American War: The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo is signed, ending the war and ceding to the United States virtually all of what is today the southwest of that country.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 3:42 PM

In 1849, it is said that dry-cleaning was accidentally discovered when a French tailor upset a lamp containing turpentine oil on his tablecloth and noticed it had a cleaning effect. He opened the very first dry cleaning shop in Paris.

While different stories reportedly tell of its origin, one thing in common is that fabric was accidentally saturated with a volatile liquid and, by surprise, the material appeared clean after it dried. One such tale tells about a French sailor who accidentally fell into a vat of turpentine and when his soiled uniform dried, it was clean!

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 3:43 PM

1849 - Regular steamboat service from the west to the east coast of the United States begins with the arrival of the SS California in San Francisco Bay. The California leaves New York Harbor on October 6, 1848, rounds Cape Horn at the tip of South America, and arrives at San Francisco, California after the 4 month 21 day journey.


digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 4:51 PM

In 1850 Levi Strauss was one of many U.S. immigrants who headed west. Many traveled in search of gold. Strauss had other plans, he hoped to open a store. He carried with him a large supply of blue canvas called denim. He thought gold hunters would need the sturdy material to make tents. Instead, he found they needed sturdy work clothes, so he used the denim to stitch together the first pair of "Levi's" jeans.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 5:11 PM

1851 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in the Oregon Territory is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 11:11 PM

The first accurate record for the mile run was set in 1852. Charles Westhall ran a 4:28 mile in London.

haydn
Haydn  (Level: 198.9 - Posts: 254)
Wed, 3rd Dec '08 11:51 PM

Potato chips, according to some sources, were invented in 1853 by chef George Crum in Saratoga Springs, NY, as a protest to a customer who kept sending his fried potatoes back because they were too thick and soggy. The crispy, thin, fried potatoes caught on at the restaurant where he worked (Moon's Lake House), and the rest is history. I would weigh about 20 pounds less were it not for George Crum.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 5:50 AM

George Eastman , born 1854, founded the Eastman Kodak Company and invented roll film, helping to bring photography to the mainstream. Roll film was also the basis for the invention of the motion picture film.

The letter "K" had been a favorite of Eastman's, he is quoted as saying, "it seems a strong, incisive sort of letter". He and his mother devised the name Kodak with an anagram set. He said that there were three principal concepts he used in creating the name: it should be short, one cannot mispronounce it, and it could not resemble anything or be associated with anything but Kodak.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 6:37 AM

William Seward Burroughs I was born on January 28, 1855.

Initially a bank clerk, he invented a "calculating machine" designed to ease the monotony of clerical work. He was a founder of the American Arithmometer Company (1886), which later became the Burroughs Adding Machine Company (1904), then the Burroughs Corporation (1953) and in 1986, merged with Sperry to form Unisys. He was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 3:28 PM

February 18, 1856 - The American Party (Know-Nothings) convene in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to nominate their first Presidential candidate, former President Millard Fillmore.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 4:10 PM

Clarence Seward Darrow (born 1857) was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Bobby Franks and defending John T. Scopes in the so-called "Monkey" Trial, in which he opposed the statesman William Jennings Bryan. He remains notable for his wit and agnosticism that marked him as one of the most famous American lawyers and civil libertarians.

digs
Digs  (Level: 116.6 - Posts: 812)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 5:21 PM

1858 - The first Macy's Department Store opened.

The eighth time was the charm for Roland Macy. After a string of seven business failures, the resilient entrepreneur finally hit the jackpot in 1858 when he founded his own department store and named it "Macy's". The store, which opened in New York City, was packed with a variety of useful products and became an immediate success. Today, Macy's is, by volume of sales, the biggest department store in the world.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 9:40 PM

1859 - John Brown raids the Harpers Ferry Armory in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in an unsuccessful bid to spark a general slave rebellion.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 4th Dec '08 9:58 PM

1860 - In the U.S. presidential election Abraham Lincoln beats John C. Breckinridge, Stephen A. Douglas, and John Bell and is elected as the 16th President of the United States, the first Republican to hold that office.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 1:01 AM

April 12 1861 - The American Civil War begins at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. Confederate batteries opened fire, firing for 33 straight hours, on the fort. The next day the fort was surrendered and evacuated. No Union soldiers died in the actual battle though a Confederate soldier bled to death having been wounded by a misfiring cannon.

The Fort Sumter Flag became a popular patriotic symbol after Maj. Anderson returned North with it. The flag is still displayed in the fort's museum.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 1:01 AM

April 12 1861 - The American Civil War begins at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. Confederate batteries opened fire, firing for 33 straight hours, on the fort. The next day the fort was surrendered and evacuated. No Union soldiers died in the actual battle though a Confederate soldier bled to death having been wounded by a misfiring cannon.

The Fort Sumter Flag became a popular patriotic symbol after Maj. Anderson returned North with it. The flag is still displayed in the fort's museum.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 6:35 AM

1862

United States president Abraham Lincoln signs into law the Pacific Railway Acts, authorizing construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Abraham Lincoln meets with a group of prominent African-Americans - the first time a President has done so. He suggests Black people should migrate to Africa or Central America, but this advice is rejected.

Battle of Antietam: Union forces defeat Confederate troops at Sharpsburg, Maryland, in the bloodiest day in U.S. history (with over 22,000 casualties).

Battle of Fredericksburg: The Union Army suffers massive casualties and abandons attempts to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia.

Battle of Chickasaw Bayou: Another victory for the Confederate Army, outnumbered 2 to 1, results in 6 times as many Union casualties, defeating several assaults coordinated by Union commander William T. Sherman.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 3:26 PM

July 1 - 3, 1863 - American Civil War: Union forces under George G. Meade turn back a Confederate invasion by Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg, the largest battle of the war (28,000 Confederate casualties, 23,000 Union).

There was one documented civilian death during the battle: Ginnie Wade, 20 years old, was shot by a stray bullet that passed through her kitchen in town while she was making bread.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 3:42 PM

1864

November 8 - U.S. presidential election, 1864: Abraham Lincoln is reelected in an overwhelming victory over George B. McClellan.

November 15 - American Civil War - Sherman's March to the Sea begins: Union General Sherman burns Atlanta and starts to move south, causing extensive devastation to crops and mills and living off the land.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 9:11 PM

1865 -
April 9 - American Civil War: General Robert E. Lee surrenders to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, effectively ending the American Civil War.
April 14 - U. S. President Abraham Lincoln is shot at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. by John Wilkes Booth.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 9:46 PM

The beverage Vernors was invented in Michigan in 1866, sharing the title of oldest soft drink with Hires Root Beer.

In 1862, James Vernor was called off to the American Civil War. According to legend, he left a mixture of ginger, vanilla and spices sitting in an oak cask in a pharmacy he had been working in. After returning from battle four years later, he opened the keg and found the drink inside had been changed by the aging process in the wood. It was like nothing else he had ever tasted, and he purportedly declared it "Deliciously different," which remains the drink's motto to this day.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 5th Dec '08 11:40 PM

1867 Alaska is purchased for $7.2 million from Alexander II of Russia, about 2 cent/acre ($4.19/km²), by United States Secretary of State William H. Seward. The news media call this "Seward's Folly."

While criticized by some at the time the financial value of the Alaska purchase turned out to be many times greater than what the United States had paid for it. The land turned out to be resource rich and also provided the US a great advantage in the Cold War.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 6th Dec '08 3:07 PM

Baseball player Jesse Burkett was born in 1868. Burkett was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946. The Wheeling native became the first West Virginian elected to Hall of Fame.

He holds the career record for Inside The Park Home Runs with 55.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 6th Dec '08 7:54 PM

1869 - The Transcontinental Railroad is completed in Promontory, Utah.

The railroad was considered the greatest American technological feat of the 19th century.


spacecat
Spacecat  (Level: 159.0 - Posts: 667)
Sat, 6th Dec '08 8:06 PM

1870

On November 1 the newly-created Weather Bureau (later renamed the National Weather Service) makes its first official meteorological forecast: "High winds at Chicago and Milwaukee... and along the Lakes". They have been getting it wrong ever since.


stellamirus
Stellamirus  (Level: 180.5 - Posts: 56)
Sat, 6th Dec '08 8:15 PM

In 1871---

America added 6,000 miles of railway track in an endeavor that occupied a tenth of its industrial labor force.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 7th Dec '08 10:53 AM

November 5 1872
U.S. presidential election,: Ulysses S. Grant defeats Horace Greeley.
Women's suffrage: In defiance of the law, American suffragist Susan B. Anthony votes for the first time (on November 18 she is served an arrest warrant and in the subsequent trial she is fined $100 - she never pays the fine).


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 7th Dec '08 2:10 PM

1873

The Heineken Brewery is founded in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Coors Brewing Company begins making beer in Golden, Colorado.

The Woman's Temperance League is organized by Eliza Daniel Stewart.


tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Sun, 7th Dec '08 2:23 PM

1874, May 20 - Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis receive a U.S. patent for blue jeans with copper rivets. The price is $13.50/dozen. Today, $13.50 buys a pocket or two and the zipper.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 7th Dec '08 3:14 PM

Thomas Hick, born 1875, was the winner of a remarkable marathon race at the 1904 Summer Olympics, held as part of the World Fair in St. Louis, Missouri.

Had the race been run under current rules, Hicks would have been disqualified, as he had been given a dose of 1/60th of a grain (roughly 1 mg.) of strychnine and some brandy by his assistants as he was flagging badly during the race; the first dose of strychnine did not revive him for long, so he was given another. As a result, he collapsed after crossing the finishing line. Another dose may well have proved fatal. Strychnine is now forbidden for athletes.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 7th Dec '08 4:54 PM

As a publicity stunt in 1876, the express train called the Transcontinental Express arrived in San Francisco, California, via the First Transcontinental Railroad only 83 hours and 39 minutes after having left New York City. The feat was reported widely in US newspapers.

When Butterfield's Overland Mail Line opened for business on 16 September 1858, the 2,795-mile journey between San Francisco and St. Louis required approximately three weeks of hard traveling, and that was during the best weather.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 8th Dec '08 2:55 AM

1877 - Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record sound, considered Edison's first great invention. Edison demonstrates the device for the first time on November 29.

Thomas Edison began his career as an inventor in Newark, New Jersey, with the automatic repeater and his other improved telegraphic devices, but the invention which first gained him fame was the phonograph in 1877. This accomplishment was so unexpected by the public at large as to appear almost magical. Edison became known as "The Wizard of Menlo Park," New Jersey, where he lived. His first phonograph recorded on tinfoil around a grooved cylinder and had poor sound quality. The tinfoil recordings could only be replayed a few times. In the 1880s, a redesigned model using wax-coated cardboard cylinders was produced by Alexander Graham Bell, Chichester Bell, and Charles Tainter. This was one reason that Thomas Edison continued work on his own "Perfected Phonograph."



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 8th Dec '08 6:58 AM

William M. Tweed died in 1878. He was sometimes informally called "Boss" Tweed, was an American politician who was convicted for stealing between 40 million and 200 million dollars from New York City taxpayers through political corruption.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 8th Dec '08 8:38 AM

1879 - Albert Einstein, German-born physicist, Nobel Prize laureate is born.

He is best known for his theory of relativity and specifically mass–energy equivalence, expressed by the equation E = mc2. Einstein received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect."

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 8th Dec '08 2:59 PM

People born in 1880

Douglas MacArthur, American general
George Marshall, United States Secretary of State, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize
W.C. Fields, American actor
Mack Sennett, Canadian director and producer
Helen Keller, American spokeswoman for the deaf and blind

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 8th Dec '08 8:02 PM

In 1881 Kansas became the first U.S. state to prohibit all alcoholic beverages.

Hard to imagine that Matt Dillion couldn't go to the Long Branch for a beer.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 8th Dec '08 9:53 PM

Sam Rayburn, born in 1882, was a Democratic politician from Bonham, Texas. "Mr. Sam", as he was widely known, served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives for seventeen years, and is regarded by some historians as the most effective Speaker in history.

As Speaker, he won a reputation for fairness and integrity. He refused to accept bribery in the form of gifts or money from lobbyists. He only said, "I am not for sale," and walked away. In his years in Congress, Rayburn always insisted on paying his own expenses, even going so far as to pay for his own travel expenses when inspecting the Panama Canal when his committee was considering legislation concerning it, rather than exercising his right to have the government pay for it.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 9th Dec '08 10:27 AM

In 1883 Samuel Mudd, American doctor to John Wilkes Booth died.

He was implicated and imprisoned for aiding and conspiring with John Wilkes Booth, in the assassination of President of the United States Abraham Lincoln.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 9th Dec '08 10:42 AM

Harry S. Truman, 33rd President of the United States is born in 1884.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 9th Dec '08 1:58 PM

1885 The Statue of Liberty arrives in New York Harbor

To prepare for transit, the Statue was reduced to 350 individual pieces and packed in 214 crates. (The right arm and the torch, which were completed earlier, had been exhibited at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, and thereafter at Madison Square in New York City.)


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 9th Dec '08 4:45 PM

Ty Cobb, Baseball Hall of Famer was born in 1886.

Nicknamed "The Georgia Peach," he was a baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. Cobb also received the most votes of any player on the 1936 inaugural Hall of Fame Ballot receiving 222 out of a possible 226 votes.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 9th Dec '08 9:25 PM

The 1887 World Series was won by the Detroit Wolverines of the National League, over the St. Louis Browns of the American Association, 10 games to 5. It was played between October 10 and October 26, and played in numerous neutral cities, as well as in Detroit and St. Louis. Detroit clinched the series in game 11.

On October 21 after a rainout the day before, Detroit and St. Louis played two games in two cities on the same day. In the morning game in Washington, the Browns pull off a triple play in an 11-4 victory over Detroit. In Game 11, played in the afternoon at Baltimore, Detroit clinched the championship with its eighth victory, 13-3.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 10th Dec '08 6:25 AM

In the 1888 U.S. presidential election Democratic Party incumbent Grover Cleveland wins the popular vote, but loses the Electoral College vote to Republican challenger Benjamin Harrison, therefore losing the election.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 10th Dec '08 3:03 PM

1889 - Herman Hollerith receives a patent for his electric tabulating machine based on punched cards in order to rapidly tabulate statistics from millions of pieces of data.

Most of the major census bureaus around the world leased his equipment and purchased his cards, as did major insurance companies. To make his system work, he invented the first automatic card-feed mechanism and the first key punch (i.e. a punch that was operated from a keyboard), which allowed a skilled operator to punch 200–300 cards per hour. He also invented a tabulator. The 1890 Tabulator was hardwired to operate only on 1890 Census cards. A wiring panel in his 1906 Type I Tabulator allowed it to do different jobs without having to be rebuilt (the first step towards programming).These inventions were the foundation of the modern information processing industry.




maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Wed, 10th Dec '08 3:34 PM

1890 Dwight David Eisenhower, U.S. general and President of the United States is born

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 10th Dec '08 4:43 PM

The Grand Trunk Western Railroad Tunnel was opened in 1891 and links Port Huron, Michigan with Canada. This international submarine railway tunnel was the first international tunnel in the world.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 10th Dec '08 9:50 PM

October 12, 1892 - To mark the 400th anniversary Columbus Day holiday, the "Pledge of Allegiance" is first recited in unison by students in U.S. public schools.

Bellamy's original Pledge read, "I Pledge Allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all."

In 1923 the National Flag Conference called for the words my Flag to be changed to the Flag of the United States. The words "of America" were added a year later.

In 1954 the words "under God" were added

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 11th Dec '08 5:13 AM

May 1 - The 1893 World's Fair, also known as the World's Columbian Exposition, opens to the public in Chicago, USA. The first United States commemorative postage stamps are issued for the Exposition.

Over 27 million people (equivalent to about half the U.S. population) attended the Exposition during its six-month run. Its scale and grandeur far exceeded the other world fairs, and it became a symbol of then-emerging American

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 11th Dec '08 2:44 PM

Winchester Model 1894 (also known as Winchester .30-30 rifle, or simply .30-30) is one of the most famous and most popular hunting rifles. It was designed by John Browning in 1894, and was produced by Winchester Repeating Arms Company until they ceased to manufacture rifles in 2006.

It was the first hunting rifle chambered for the (then) new smokeless powder cartridges. The .30-30 Winchester is the cartridge that has become synonymous with the Model 1894 rifle.





maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Thu, 11th Dec '08 3:15 PM

Babe Ruth, American baseball player was born in 1895.

Ruth's 1919 contract that sent him from Boston to New York was sold at auction for $996,000 at Sotheby's on June 10, 2005. The most valuable memorabilia item relating to Ruth was his 1923 bat which he used to hit the first home run at Yankee Stadium on April 18, 1923. Ruth's heavy Louisville Slugger solid ash wood bat sold for $1.26 million at a Sotheby's auction in December 2004, making it the second most valuable baseball memorabilia item to date, just behind the famous 1909 Honus Wagner baseball card.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 11th Dec '08 4:09 PM

The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event which was celebrated in Athens, Greece, from April 6 to April 15, 1896. It was the first Olympic Games held in the Modern era.

The 1896 Olympics were regarded as a great success. The Games had the largest international participation of any sporting event to that date. Panathinaiko Stadium, the first big stadium in the modern world, overflowed with the largest crowd ever to watch a sporting event.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 11th Dec '08 9:36 PM

The inaugural meeting between Ohio State and Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1897 resulted in a lopsided victory for Michigan, with the Wolverines posting a 34-0 win over Ohio State's Buckeyes. The game was ranked by ESPN in 2000 as the greatest North American sports rivalry.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 12th Dec '08 9:42 AM

1898
February 15 - Spanish-American War: The USS Maine explodes and sinks in Havana harbor, Cuba for then unknown reasons, killing 266 men. This event helps lead the United States to declare war on Spain.

April 5 - Annie Oakley promotes the service of women in combat situations with the United States military. On this day, she writes a letter to President McKinley "offering the government the services of a company of 50 'lady sharpshooters' who would provide their own arms and ammunition should war break out with Spain.". In the history of women in the military, there are records of female U.S. Revolutionary and Civil War soldiers who enlisted using male pseudonyms, but Oakley's letter represents possibly the earliest political move towards women's rights for combat service in the United States military.



stone
Stone  (Level: 35.0 - Posts: 259)
Fri, 12th Dec '08 10:38 AM

1899 -- Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid robbed a train, the Union Pacific Railroad in the 'wilds' of Wyoming. They ordered the clerk to open the express car, he refused, and they blew it open.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Fri, 12th Dec '08 11:24 AM

By baseball convention the "Modern Era" began in 1900, roughly when the rules and conventions were stabilizing. The American League was founded in that year. It was also the first year where home plate acquired its current pentagon shape.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Fri, 12th Dec '08 4:05 PM

The Great Fire of 1901 in Jacksonville, Florida was one of the worst disasters in Florida history and the largest urban fire in the Southeast. It was similar in scale and destruction to the Great Chicago Fire.

The fire swept through 146 city blocks, destroyed over 2,368 buildings and left almost 10,000 people homeless all in the course of eight hours. It is said the glow from the flames could be seen in Savannah, Georgia; smoke plumes in Raleigh, North Carolina.





loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 12th Dec '08 4:43 PM

January 1, 1902 - The first college football bowl game, the Rose Bowl between Michigan and Stanford, is held in Pasadena, California.

The inaugural game featured Fielding Yost's dominating 1901 Michigan team, representing the East, who crushed a previously 3-1-2 team from Stanford University, representing the West, by a score of 49-0 after Stanford quit in the third quarter. Michigan finished the season 11–0 and was considered the national champion. Yost had been Stanford's coach the previous year. The game was so lopsided that for the next 15 years, the Tournament of Roses officials ran chariot races, ostrich races, and other various events instead of football. But, on New Year's Day 1916 football returned to stay as Washington State University defeated Brown University in the first annual Rose Bowl.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 12th Dec '08 7:24 PM

December 17, 1903 - Orville Wright flies an aircraft with a petrol engine at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in the first documented, successful, controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 13th Dec '08 8:32 AM

1904 - U.S. Army engineers begin work on The Panama Canal

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 14th Dec '08 12:05 AM

Construction of the sixth HMS Dreadnought of the Royal Navy started in 1905. Thebattleship revolutionized naval power when she entered service. Dreadnought represented such a marked advance in naval technology that her name came to be associated with an entire generation of battleships, the "dreadnoughts", as well as the class of ships named after her, while the generation of ships she made obsolete became known as "pre-dreadnoughts".


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 14th Dec '08 6:57 AM

April 18 - The 1906 San Francisco earthquake (estimated magnitude 7.8) on the San Andreas Fault destroys much of San Francisco, California, killing at least 3,000, with 225,000-300,000 left homeless.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 14th Dec '08 9:19 PM

American actor John Wayne was born in 1907.

He attended the University of Southern California (USC), majoring in pre-law. He was injured in a body surfing accident and lost his athletic scholarship. Without funds, he had to leave the university.

Wayne began working at the local film studios. Western star Tom Mix had got him a summer job in the prop department in exchange for football tickets. Wayne soon moved on to bit parts, establishing a long friendship with the director who provided most of those parts,

stone
Stone  (Level: 35.0 - Posts: 259)
Mon, 15th Dec '08 1:22 PM

June 30, 1908 or June 17, by the Julian calendar, the Tunguska event or explosion estimated at a height of 3-6 miles with an estimated force of 5-30 megatons of TNT (according to Wiki). The explosion in Siberia knocked over an estimated 80 million trees over 830 sq miles.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Mon, 15th Dec '08 1:32 PM

1909. The Lincoln Cent was first minted. In 1909 the coin came in a 1909 no mint mark (Philadelphia), 1909-VDB the designers initials and no mint mark (Philadelphia), 1909-S (San Francisco) and 1909-S-VDB. This last coin, which I have an almost uncirculated version of in my collection, is one of the most prized coins of standard collections.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 15th Dec '08 4:09 PM

The Great Fire of 1910 wildfire burns about 3 million acres in northeast Washington, northern Idaho, and western Montana over 2 days and kills 86 people (believed to be the largest fire in recorded United States history).


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 15th Dec '08 5:25 PM

1911 - The Great Blue Norther of 11/11/11

The Great Blue Norther of 11/11/11 (November 11, 1911) was the biggest cold snap in U.S. history. Many cities broke record highs early that afternoon. By nightfall, cities were dealing with single-digit temperatures on the Fahrenheit scale. This is the only day in many midwest cities' weather bureau jurisdictions where the record highs and lows were broken for the same day. Blue norther is also known as just norther.

The main cause of such a dramatic cold snap was an extremely strong storm system separating warm, humid air from frigid, arctic air.
Temperatures in Kansas City had reached a record high of 76° F by late morning before the front moved through. As the cold front approached, the winds increased turning from southeast to northwest. By midnight, the temperature had dropped to 11° F , a 65 Fahrenheit degree (35 celsius degree) difference in 14 hours.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 15th Dec '08 8:47 PM

April 14, 1912 - Titanic strikes an iceberg in the northern Atlantic Ocean at 11:40 pm. She will sink at 2:20 am the following morning, taking with her the lives of more than 1,500.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 16th Dec '08 6:43 AM

December 1, 1913 - The Ford Motor Company introduces the first moving assembly line, reducing chassis assembly time from 12½ hours in October to 2 hours, 40 minutes (although Ford is not the first to use an assembly line, his successful adoption of one sparks an era of mass production).


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 16th Dec '08 11:34 AM

January 5, 1914 - The Ford Motor Company announces an eight-hour workday and a
minimum $5 a day wage


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 16th Dec '08 1:16 PM

May 7, 1915 - The RMS Lusitania is sunk by a German U-boat, killing 1,198.

The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany, and was probably a major factor in the eventual decision of the United States to join the war in 1917. Some people believe that the ship was a blockade runner, and thus a legitimate target. It is often considered by historians to be the second most famous civilian passenger liner disaster after the sinking of Titanic.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 16th Dec '08 3:42 PM

July 1 - November 18, 1916: More than 1 million soldiers die during the Battle of the Somme, including 60,000 casualties for the British Commonwealth on the first day.

With more than 1.5 million casualties, it is one of the bloodiest military operations recorded. The Allied forces attempted to break through the German lines along a 12-mile (19 km) front north and south of the River Somme

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 16th Dec '08 4:36 PM

February 24, 1917 - World War I: United States ambassador to the United Kingdom Walter H. Page is given the Zimmermann Telegram, in which Germany offers to give the American Southwest back to Mexico, if Mexico declares war on the United States.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 16th Dec '08 8:18 PM

1918 - World War I ends: Germany signs an armistice agreement with the Allies in a railroad car outside of Compiègne in France. It becomes official on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 17th Dec '08 10:33 PM

The events of the 1919 World Series are often associated with the Black Sox Scandal, when several members of the Chicago franchise conspired with gamblers to throw World Series games.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 17th Dec '08 11:36 PM

1920 - The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the "Jazz Age" or the "Roaring Twenties", when speaking about the United States and Canada. In Europe the decade is sometimes referred to as the "Golden Twenties".

January 1 - Babe Ruth is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for $125,000, the largest sum ever paid for a player at that time.

January 16 - Prohibition begins in the United States with the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution coming into effect.

August 20 - The first commercial radio station in the United States, 8MK (WWJ), begins operations in Detroit, Michigan.

September 29 -The first domestic radio sets come to stores in the United States; a Westinghouse radio costs $10.

Adolf Hitler makes his first public political speech, in Austria.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 18th Dec '08 6:20 AM

The Tulsa race riot, also known as the 1921 race riot, The night that Tulsa died, the Tulsa Race War, or the Greenwood riot, was a massacre during a large-scale civil disorder confined mainly to the racially segregated Greenwood neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma,

Officially, thirty-nine people were reported killed in the riot, of whom ten were white. The actual number of black citizens killed by white local militiamen and volunteers as a result of the riot was estimated in the Red Cross report at around 300; making the Tulsa race riot the worst in US history.

In June 2001, the Oklahoma state legislature passed the "1921 Tulsa Race Riot Reconciliation Act." It provided for 300+ college scholarships for descendants of Greenwood residents, mandated the creation of a memorial to those who died in the riot, and called for new efforts to promote economic development in Greenwood.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 18th Dec '08 1:12 PM

Jimmie Foxx finished his career with 1922 runs batted in. Nicknamed Double X and The Beast he was a first baseman and noted power hitter in Major League Baseball.

Foxx was one of the three or four most feared sluggers of his era. The great Yankee pitcher Lefty Gomez once said of him, "He has muscles in his hair."

At the end of his career in 1945, his 534 home runs placed him second only to Ruth on the all-time list, and first among right-handed hitters. He retained these positions until Willie Mays passed Foxx for second place in 1966

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 18th Dec '08 8:53 PM

The original Yankee Stadium opened in 1923. Soon after its opening, Yankee Stadium came to be known as "The House that Ruth Built", in reference to the Yankees' star player, Babe Ruth. Ruth's power as a drawing card had enabled the Yankees to build their own stadium in the Bronx after their rivals across the Harlem River in Manhattan, the New York Giants, were threatening to evict them from the Polo Grounds.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 19th Dec '08 6:36 AM

1924 - Stop signs were standardized with black lettering on a yellow background. Two years previously the octagon shape had been adopted. The unique eight-sided shape of the sign allows drivers facing the back of the sign to identify that oncoming drivers have a stop sign and prevent confusion with other traffic signs. It was also chosen so that it could be identified easily at night, since the original signs were not reflective.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 19th Dec '08 7:26 AM

1925
March 21 - Tennessee Governor Austin Peay signs the Butler Act, prohibiting the teaching of evolution in the state's public schools.
May 5 - Dayton, Tennessee, biology teacher John Scopes is arrested for teaching Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution.
July 21 - Scopes Trial: In Dayton, Tennessee, high school biology teacher John T. Scopes is found guilty of teaching evolution in class and fined $100.



loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 19th Dec '08 6:38 PM

Route 66, US Highway 66, was established on November 11, 1926. The famous highway originally ran from Chicago, Illinois, through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California, before ending at Los Angeles, encompassing a total of 2,448 miles. It was recognized in popular culture by both a hit song and a television show in the 50s and 60s.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 19th Dec '08 10:30 PM

1927 - Charles Lindbergh makes the first solo non-stop trans-Atlantic flight, from New York to Paris.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 20th Dec '08 12:06 AM

Baseball pitcher Joe Nuxhall was born in 1928. he was long most remembered for having been the youngest player ever to appear in a major league game in the modern era, pitching 2/3 of an inning for the Reds on June 10, 1944 at the age of 15years, 316 days due to player shortages during World War II.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 20th Dec '08 7:49 AM

1929

October 24 - October 29 - Wall Street Crash of 1929: Three multi-digit percentage drops wipe out more than $30 billion from the New York Stock Exchange (10 times greater than the annual budget of the federal government).


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 20th Dec '08 10:00 AM

1930
The first frozen foods of Clarence Birdseye go on sale in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Hostess Twinkies are invented.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 20th Dec '08 9:29 PM

Knute Rockne, American football coach was only 43 when he died in a plane crash in Kansas on March 31, 1931

For all his success, Rockne made what an Associated Press writer called "one of the greatest coaching blunders in history." Instead of coaching his 1926 team against Carnegie Tech, Rockne traveled to Chicago for the Army-Navy Game in order to "write newspaper articles about it, as well as select an All-America football team." Carnegie Tech used the coach's absence as motivation for a 19–0 win; the upset likely cost the Irish a shot at the national title

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 20th Dec '08 11:15 PM

In 1932 the Cipher Bureau broke the German Enigma cipher.

The machine has gained notoriety because Allied cryptologists were able to decrypt a vast number of messages that had been enciphered on the machine. The intelligence, consequently codenamed ULTRA, was a substantial aid to the Allied war effort. The exact influence of ULTRA is debated, but an oft-repeated assessment is that decryption of German ciphers hastened the end of the European war by two years.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 21st Dec '08 8:05 AM

1933
January 30 Nazi leader Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany by President of Germany Paul von Hindenburg.
January 30 The Lone Ranger debuts on American radio.
February 1 - Adolf Hitler gives his "Proclamation to the German People" in Berlin.
March 2 - The original film version of King Kong, starring Fay Wray, premieres at Radio City Music Hall and the RKO Roxy Theatre in New York City.
April 26 - The Gestapo is established in Germany.
May 10 - In Germany, the Nazis stage massive public book burnings.
May 27 - Walt Disney's classic Silly Symphony cartoon The Three Little Pigs is first released.
July 6 - The first Major League Baseball All-Star Game is played at Comiskey Park in Chicago.




loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 5:58 AM

February 22, 1934 - Frank Capra's It Happened One Night , starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, is released. It becomes a smash hit and the first of Capra's great screen classics. It becomes the first film to win all 5 of the major Academy Awards - Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Screenplay, Best Director, and Best Picture. Gable and Colbert receive their only Oscars for this film.


alvandy
Alvandy  (Level: 229.7 - Posts: 7573)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 6:47 AM

March 13, 1935
DRIVING TESTS WERE INTRODUCED IN GREAT BRITAIN

but they were taught to drive on the wrong side of the road!

(((((ducking)))))





sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 7:21 AM

August 3, 1936 - African-American athlete Jesse Owens wins the 100-meter dash at the Berlin Olympics.

Jesse Owens's participation in the Olympics was controversial because of his race, at a time when segregation and discrimination against blacks were the norm in much of the United States. However, once in Berlin, Owens was able to freely use public transportation and enter bars and other public facilities without the difficulty he would face as a black man in the United States.




townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 9:29 AM

February 11, 1937 - A sit-down strike ends when General Motors recognizes the United Automobile Workers Union.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 10:03 AM

September 4, 1938 - During the ceremony marking the unveiling of a plaque at Pointe de Grave, France celebrating Franco-American friendship, American Ambassador William Bullitt in a speech states, "France and the United States were united in war and peace", leading to much speculation in the press that if war did break out over Czechoslovakia, then the United States would join the war on the Allied side.

September 9 U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt disallows the popular interpretation of Bullitt’s speech at a press conference at the White House. Roosevelt states it is “100% wrong” the U.S. would join a “stop-Hitler bloc” under any circumstances, and makes it quite clear that in the event of German aggression against Czechoslovakia, the U.S. would remain neutral.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 3:50 PM

Movie historians and film buffs often look back on the year 1939 as "the greatest year in film history". Hollywood was at the height of its Golden Age, and this particular year saw the release of an unusually large number of exceptional movies, many of which have been honored as all-time classics, when multitudes of other films of the era have been largely forgotten.

Some of the classics released in 1939

Gone with the Wind MGM
The Wizard of Oz MGM
Mr Smith Goes to Washington Columbia
The Hunchback of Notre Dame RKO
Goodbye, Mr. Chips MGM


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 22nd Dec '08 5:47 PM

May 30, 1940 - Winston Churchill, in his first address as Prime Minister, tells the House of Commons, "I have nothing to offer you but blood, toil, tears, and sweat."

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 5:46 AM

December 7, 1941 - The Japanese Navy launches a surprise attack on the United States fleet at Pearl Harbor, thus drawing the United States into World War II.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 11:11 AM

1942 is an old school arcade game from 1984. It continuously scrolled vertically while you tried to shoot down as many enemy airplanes as you could.

larefamiliaris
Larefamiliaris  (Level: 135.2 - Posts: 877)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 12:53 PM

In 1943 Henrik Carl Peter Dam and Edward Adelbert Doisy shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of vitamin K.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 2:09 PM

June 4, 1944 - A hunter-killer group of the United States Navy captures the German submarine U-505, marking the first time a U.S. Navy vessel has captured an enemy vessel at sea since the 19th century.

The capture of codebooks on U-505 allowed Allied cryptanalysts to break the special "coordinate" code in enciphered German messages and determine more precise locations for U-boat operating areas. In addition to directing hunter-killer task groups to these locations, these coordinates enabled Allied convoy commanders to route shipping away from known U-boat locations, greatly inhibiting the effectiveness of German submarine patrols.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 2:34 PM

September 9 - The first actual case of (a computer) bug being found, is a moth lodged in a relay of a Harvard Mark II computer at the Naval Weapons Center in Dahlgren, Virginia.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 3:51 PM

1946 - RCA demonstrates an all-electronic color television system.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 4:07 PM

1947 - Sargon is born

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 9:08 PM

Donora, Pennsylvania Smog of 1948.- Between October 26 and October 31 an air inversion trapped industrial effluent (air pollution) from the American Steel and Wire plant and Donora Zinc Works. "In three days, 20 people died... After the inversion lifted, another 50 died. Hundreds more finished the rest of their lives with damaged lungs and hearts.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 23rd Dec '08 10:48 PM

January 17, 1949 - The first Volkswagen Beetle to arrive in the United States, a 1948 model, is brought over to New York by Dutch businessman Ben Pon. Unable to interest dealers or importers in the Volkswagen, Pon sells the sample car to pay his travel expenses. Only two 1949 models will be sold in America that year, convincing Volkswagen chairman Heinrich Nordhoff that the car has no future in the U.S. (The VW Beetle goes on to become the greatest automobile phenomenon in American history.)

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 24th Dec '08 6:31 AM

Ransom Eli Olds died in 1950. He was a pioneer of the American automotive industry, for whom both the Oldsmobile and Reo brands were named. He claimed to have built his first steam car as early as 1894, and his first gasoline powered car in 1896.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Wed, 24th Dec '08 6:59 PM

December 24, 1951 - Gian-Carlo Menotti's 45-minute opera Amahl and the Night Visitors premieres live on NBC, becoming the first opera written especially for television

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 25th Dec '08 1:12 AM

1952 - Nearly 58,000 cases of polio are reported in the U.S.; 3,145 die and 21,269 are left with mild to disabling paralysis.

Lest we forget how much things have improved.



townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Thu, 25th Dec '08 6:37 AM

1953

The first Chevrolet Corvette is built at Flint, Michigan.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 1:27 AM

1954 - After authorizing $385 million over the $400 million already budgeted for military aid to Vietnam, U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower warns against United States intervention in Vietnam.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 7:46 AM

December 1, 1955 - Rosa Parks is arrested for refusing to give up her seat on the bus to a white person, and the national civil rights movement begins.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 10:35 AM

September 9, 1956 - Elvis Presley appears on The Ed Sullivan Show for the first time.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 7:14 PM

November 1, 1957 - The Mackinac Bridge, the world's longest suspension bridge between anchorages at the time, opens to traffic connecting Michigan's 2 peninsulas.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 7:22 PM

July 9 1958. Sandracam celebrated her 3rd birthday. She had no idea of the sh*t that laid ahead.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 7:36 PM

or lay. Just spent the first Christmas of my life without family or close friends. I worked 12 hr shifts on the 23, 24 and 25. My dad died on Dec 7 and today would have been his birthday. Was with him and mom when he died, but now up here feeling weird and sad. Sorry to intrude, just...

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Fri, 26th Dec '08 10:21 PM

The darkest hour is just before dawn.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 2:44 AM

I hope so. MCMLIX- Rebel troops led by Che Guervara enter Havana.

alvandy
Alvandy  (Level: 229.7 - Posts: 7573)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 4:39 AM

1960- [November 8] John F. Kennedy defeats Richard M. Nixon in a very close U.S. Presidential election.
Kennedy was 43 years old and became the youngest man elected to be president.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 5:59 AM

From John Kenndy's 1960 Inaugural Address:

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.

My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 6:37 AM

From John Kenndy's 1961 Inaugural Address:

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.

My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 6:52 AM

1962 - In a speech to Congress President Kennedy put forth the following challenge:

I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 10:27 AM

November 22, 1963- In Dallas, Texas, United States President John F. Kennedy is shot to death, Texas Governor John B. Connally is seriously wounded, and Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson becomes the 36th President. All television coverage for the next three days is devoted to the assassination, its aftermath, the procession of the horsedrawn casket to the Capitol Rotunda, and the funeral of President Kennedy.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 10:43 AM

Part of the sh*t that lay ahead. I still have the scrapbook I made for JFK. Believe his and the other assassinations soon to follow deeply influenced my generation.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 10:52 AM

It sure was a turning point. I was in high school at the time and was very naive. I thought that something like that could not happen in modern America.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 11:02 AM

I was only 8. I was at a neighbor's house as the Catholic school I attended was off that day so the nuns could attend the funeral of another nun! We were eating lunch and 3 yr old Everil ran in and turned on the tv. They announced that President Kennedy had been shot and was in critical condition. Mom came home from work to pick me up and was crying.
My dad always said that in those days-early 60s-people felt like anything was possible. And I suppose that's true, unless you were black, or gay, or.....

chickfbref1
Chickfbref1  (Level: 120.7 - Posts: 2012)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 12:02 PM

1964 - Gracie Allen says "goodnight" for the last time.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 1:48 PM

March 8, 1965 - Vietnam War: Some 3,500 United States Marines arrive in South Vietnam, becoming the first American combat troops in Vietnam.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 4:14 PM

June 13, 1966 - Miranda v. Arizona: The Supreme Court of the United States rules that the police must inform suspects of their rights before questioning them.


chickfbref1
Chickfbref1  (Level: 120.7 - Posts: 2012)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 4:19 PM

1967 on a warm August night, Sploofuser GerryN gave birth to a gorgeous, smart, funny and talented baby. They named her Kelly and she would always be their favorite child.

You would all come to know her as Chick...Gerry still calls her perfect.

bwahahahaha

Me.

wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 5:38 PM

In 1968 both Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King were assassinated, Nasa launched Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo mission and 1minute & 5 seconds of the Oakland Raiders - New York Jets game was cut off to broadcast "Heidi".

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 6:08 PM

1969 - Sargon marries the love of his life. In a few months they will be celebrating their 40th anniversary.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 6:29 PM

Congrats Sargon!. Wordster, that Raiders game transformed me from a silly Heidi waiting little girl to a true football fan! Chick, glad to know I'm not (quite) old enough to be your mother!

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sat, 27th Dec '08 7:48 PM

April 13, 1970 - An oxygen tank in the Apollo 13 spacecraft explodes, forcing the crew to abort the mission and return in 4 days.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 1:41 AM

Jim Morrison of the Doors died in Paris at age 27. Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers died in a motorcycle wreck at age 24.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 2:33 AM

Above were in 1971.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 5:54 AM

1972 - Atari kicks off the first generation of video games with the release of their seminal arcade version of Pong, the first game to achieve commercial success.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 11:11 AM

January 14, 1973 - Elvis Presley's concert in Hawaii is watched by over a billion people live worldwide.

ne1410s
Ne1410s  (Level: 239.0 - Posts: 24)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 11:26 AM

August 26, 1974, I began my teaching career.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 2:39 PM

1975 - Altair 8800 is released, sparking the era of the microcomputer

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Sun, 28th Dec '08 3:45 PM

July 4, 1976 From coast to coast, the United States celebrates the 200th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.

In the months approaching the Bicentennial, Schoolhouse Rock, a series of educational cartoon shorts running on ABC between programs on Saturday mornings, created a sub-series called "History Rock," although the official name was "America Rock." The ten segments covered various aspects of American history and government. Several of the segments, most notably one dealing with the preamble of the Constitution put to music, have become some of Schoolhouse Rock's most popular segments.




sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 29th Dec '08 6:06 AM

June 5, 1977 - The first Apple II computers go on sale. By the end of its production in 1993, somewhere between five and six million Apple II series computers (including approximately 1.25 million Apple IIGS models) had been produced.


townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Mon, 29th Dec '08 8:35 AM

1978 - Volkswagen becomes the second (after Rolls-Royce) non-American automobile manufacturer to open a plant in the United States, commencing production of the Rabbit, the North American version of the Volkswagen Golf, in New Stanton, Pennsylvania with a unionized (UAW) workforce.


maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Mon, 29th Dec '08 12:46 PM

July 12, 1979 - A Disco Demolition Night publicity stunt goes awry at Comiskey Park, forcing the Chicago White Sox to forfeit their game against the Detroit Tigers.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Mon, 29th Dec '08 3:00 PM

December 8, 1980 - Former Beatle John Lennon dies in a hospital after being shot outside his New York City apartment by Mark David Chapman, a deranged fan who had received his signature earlier in the day.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Mon, 29th Dec '08 5:18 PM

1981 - A jury of architects and sculptors unanimously selects Maya Lin's design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial from 1,421 other entries.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 1:33 AM

December 26, 1982 - Time Magazine's Man of the Year is given for the first time to a non-human, the computer.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 5:34 AM

1983 Sally Ride becomes the first American woman in space, on the Space Shuttle Challenger.

townline
Townline  (Level: 54.0 - Posts: 213)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 9:02 AM

The 1984 Tigers displayed a dominance seldom seen in baseball. They were in first place from opening day until the final game of the World Series. After opening with a 35-5 mark, Detroit coasted to a 15 game win in the tough A.L. East. The domination continued into the post-season where they swept Kansas City in the ALCS, then beat San Diego four games to one to win the World Series.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 10:31 AM

"1985" is the final, climactic cut on the album "Band On The Run" by Paul McCartney & Wings.

maple542
Maple542  (Level: 91.3 - Posts: 135)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 11:24 AM

1986

Space Shuttle Challenger disintegrates 73 seconds after launch, killing the crew of 7 astronauts, including schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 3:16 PM

In 1987 American Motors Corporation was acquired by the Chrysler Corporation

pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 5:10 PM

1988 Van Halen released 0U812!

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 6:47 PM

1989 - The U.S. government seizes the Irving, CA Lincoln Savings and Loan Association; Charles Keating (for whom the Keating Five were named -- John McCain among them) eventually goes to jail, as part of the massive 1980s Savings and Loan Crisis which costs U.S. taxpayers nearly $200 billion in bailouts, and many people their life savings

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 8:04 PM

In 1990 Expedition 90 took an armada of canoes and canoeists the full length of the Grand River in Michigan over 2 weeks as an effort to raise awareness of river and water issues. IT was led by world famous canoeist Verlen Kruger. I was part of a 17 person team who paddled a 35' Montreal class Voyageur Canoe out passed the breakwater into 3' waves in Lake Michigan at Grand Haven. That made us the only people to completely finish the river.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Tue, 30th Dec '08 8:29 PM

1991 - Operation Desert Storm begins with air strikes against Iraq.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 8:46 AM

1992 - Windows 3.1 is released by Microsoft.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 9:35 AM

gonna be a lot tougher to post here after #2009 I would say!

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 9:49 AM

The VCD standard was created in 1993 by Sony, Philips, Matsushita, and JVC.

Video CD (abbreviated as VCD, and also known as View CD, Compact Disc digital video) is a standard digital format for storing video on a Compact Disc. VCDs are playable in dedicated VCD players, most modern DVD-Video players, personal computers, and some video game consoles.



wordster
Wordster  (Level: 159.7 - Posts: 911)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 10:01 AM

In 1994 Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as South Africa's first black president.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 10:12 AM

1995 (19.95) the price of everything for sale on late night tv.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 11:17 AM

1996 - Democratic incumbent Bill Clinton defeats Republican challenger Bob Dole to win his second term

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 2:42 PM

Barry Sanders' greatest season came in 1997. After a start in which he gained 53 yards on 25 carries in the first two games of the season, Sanders ran off an NFL record 14 consecutive 100 yard games, including two 200 yard performances, en route to rushing for 2,053 yards.

He holds the national college single-season rushing record with 2,628 rushing yards in 1988.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 6:19 PM

1998 Google, Inc. is founded in Menlo Park, California, by Stanford University Ph.D. candidates Larry Page and Sergey Brin.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 7:15 PM

March 29, 1999 - For the first time, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closes above the 10,000 mark, at 10,006.78.

Today the DJIA closed at 8776.39.

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 9:16 PM

February 13, 2000 - The final original Peanuts comic strip is published, following the death of its creator, Charles Schulz.


loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Wed, 31st Dec '08 11:09 PM

September 11, 2001 - Almost 3,000 are killed after terrorists hijack and crash American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175 into the World Trade Center's Twin Towers in New York City, American Airlines Flight 77 into the Pentagon, and United Airlines Flight 93 into a grassland in rural Shanksville, Pennsylvania.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 5:55 AM

In 2002, President Carter received the Nobel Peace Prize for his work “to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development” through The Carter Center He was the third U.S. President, after Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, to be awarded the Prize. Carter shares with Martin Luther King, Jr., the distinction of being the only native Georgians to be so honored.



sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 6:01 AM

American competitive swimmer Gertrude Ederle died in 2003.In 1926, she became the first woman to swim across the English Channel. Only five men had been able to swim the English Channel before Ederle. The best time had been 16 hours, 33 minutes by an Italian-born Argentine, Enrique Tiraboschi. Ederle walked up the beach at Dover, England after 14 hours and 39 minutes.





loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 6:40 AM

2004 - The last Oldsmobile rolls off of the assembly line.

loveland
Loveland  (Level: 55.2 - Posts: 521)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 6:49 AM

In 2005 the Chicago White Sox beat the Houston Astros in 4 games to win their first World Series since 1917

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 9:15 AM

2006 Warren Buffett donates over $30 billion to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

2007 - Microsoft releases Windows Vista and Office 2007.


sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 12:29 PM

2008 - Barack Obama is elected the 44th President of the United States and Joe Biden is elected the 47th Vice President. Barack Obama becomes the first African-American President-elect

sargon
Sargon  (Level: 112.0 - Posts: 1256)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 12:30 PM

2009 - Happy New Year !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.2 - Posts: 3779)
Thu, 1st Jan '09 3:51 PM

CLOSED ---- GO TO THE NEW THREAD ---- ADD A NUMBER 5


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