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sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 7:17 PM

LEGALIZING MARIJUANA

I didn't realize that marijuana was California's largest cash crop. Amazing! Quite a tax windfall if it was made legal!

chickfbref1
Chickfbref1  (Level: 120.7 - Posts: 2012)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 7:22 PM

From your keyboard to Obama's pen. This is the dumbest law in the history of the world.

HRH...Me.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 7:32 PM

The stuff is so strong now (so I've heard) that they may need to enact SUI laws. Voila! More money in the state coffers.

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 219.7 - Posts: 1935)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 7:34 PM

Its BC's biggest cash crop too, oh how I wish we could snag some of those tax dollars. Health care, education, the list goes on & on, would really benefit. In a book written by a US DEA (sorry can't remember the name) a idea was put forth that the war on drugs for responsible for the uncertain world economy, that is, the money taken from a countries economy from purchasing illegal drugs did not circulate, thus no job creation. Apparently the Cocaine people have rooms stacked to the ceiling with greenbacks unable to spend or invest it. I'm sure a certain amount is laundered but not enough. This theory is somewhat like I operate my finances, money is made round to go round

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 7:38 PM

Did you see the movie "Blow"? Depicts the wall to wall money stacks. Also, Pee Wee Herman is in it (and very good!)

crazy4games
Crazy4games  (Level: 123.0 - Posts: 1020)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 8:41 PM

Ditto, Chick!

donden
Donden  (Level: 112.5 - Posts: 2127)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 8:56 PM

California pot wasn't worth the match it took to light it. They must have made some great improvements in the last few years. But then I wouldn't know about those things.

lucimoore
Lucimoore  (Level: 183.1 - Posts: 1683)
Tue, 24th Feb '09 9:00 PM

Lying bag of dried up seed...

mistymented1
Mistymented1  (Level: 26.0 - Posts: 163)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 2:22 PM

Decriminalize - Don't Legalize

Just my humble opinion on the matter.



Yes marijuana is a drug just as alcohol and nicotine and tobacco which contribute to more deaths every day! The only reason those are legal is because of the income through taxes that the federal and state government make.

In a system of legalization the government saves resources β€” as they would under decriminalization β€” but they can also use its power to tax and regulate the product's quality and strength.

Decriminalize ~
adults who possess one ounce of marijuana or less will be from a misdemeanor to an infraction - issued tickets and assessed a nominal fine in lieu of criminal charges (up to one-year in jail, under current law). This would also pertain to all medical use of cannabis.



Total cost of drug prohibition
Over 300,000 nonviolent people lose their freedom to prison/jail.
Thousands of murders, assaults, and robberies caused by drug crimes.
$20 billion/year in law enforcement costs.
$10 billion/year in lost tax revenue (similar to alcohol tax).
$5 billion/year in property losses due to drug-related crimes.
$50 billion/year and 500,000 jobs lost because of no hemp industry.
Total cost = $85 billion/year = $500 per taxpayer every year!

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.2 - Posts: 21598)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 2:42 PM

I am for legalization of drugs period. The War on them is futile and very costly. That they like alcohol and tobacco cause deaths and disease is a given but one only has to look at the Prohibition Laws to see how ineffective they were. Bootleggers made fortunes-see the Kennedys- and people died in a second from drinking bathtub gin. Speak-Easys thrived and law enforcement was paid to look the other way. Legalization would not only mean tax revenue but possible control of what goes into said drugs and treatment for the addicted perhaps. Legalization costs money too because then it becomes a matter of regulatory boards which are usually huge and corrupt themselves. Think history has taught us or should have that trying to legislate morality or someone's idea of morality doesn't work. It becomes again the lesser of evils which seems to be what everything is about these days. Again, IMHO- Linda

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 5:32 PM

I have no intention of joining this particular discussion.

Except for one thing.

Linda, the biggest things we legislate ARE based on morality.

Murder, theft - those ARE morality laws. (Thou shalt not kill, thou shalt not steal) The vast majority of laws have some kind of relationship to those two moral laws.

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 6:03 PM

1. I was waiting to hear from Jank before posting anything. It is true that most of the criminal laws are based in what most people would call "morality" -- but the most successful of these laws are successful because an overwhelming majority of the population support the underlying "moral' proposition advanced by the law. A large percentage of the population -- although apparently still a minority at present -- do not accept the underlying proposition that smoking marijuana and, to a lesser extent, other drugs, is even a question of morality, and certainly do not support these laws. While many or most people who support decriminalization or legalization do not use illegal drugs, for a variety of reasons discussed in this thread, see these laws as counterproductive to societal interests. The prohibition of marijuana is particularly galling, given its medicinal properties and its generally benign effects. It poses a level of risk magnitudes below that of alcohol. There has never been a confirmed death from marijuana intoxication.

2. So far, under the Obama administration, raids of clinics dispensing medicinal marijuana legal under state law have continued. I have read -- but cannot confirm -- that the DEA is acting as a rogue agency, and that Obama does intend to call off the dogs, and it may happen.

3. The corruption that drug prohibition brings to the police and judiciary is well documented. One example of massive abuse of the drug laws comes from Jank's homestate and the town of Tulia, where an undercover agent claimed to have bought drugs from 40 African-Americans in the community and 6 whites with ties to the black community. A lot of people were sentenced to long prison terms -- I think all sprung now -- based on this guy's testimony, which, unfortunately, was fabricated nonsense. After initial trials in which black Tulia victims saw all-white juries convict on the agent's say-so and the lengthy sentences that followed pled guilty to crimes they did not commit to avoid even longer sentences, if convicted following a trial.

4. "Civil" forfeiture laws that follow drug prohibition are also an outrage. In many jurisdictions (maybe most, I don't know the law of all states), if your kid or a guest brings a couple of joints into your home -- without your knowledge, even if against your express wishes -- this can be grounds for the authorities to seize your home and auction it off to the highest bidder.

kaufman
Kaufman  (Level: 256.8 - Posts: 3936)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 6:18 PM

Right about "civil forfeiture". It's one of our country's biggest outrages that things can be taken and fenced without a conviction, and without a sentence deeming those items as part of the fine. Such without due process is out-and-out theft.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.2 - Posts: 21598)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 6:21 PM

I don't know the particular Texas thing that TSK talks about but the rest of what he said is my view only he says it better-surely everyone can see that legalizing drugs would do away with the drug wars affecting states like Texas and Arizona. Is drug use healthy almost surely not but making it illegal makes for a lot of corruption in law enforcement and a whole lot of rich bad people.- Linda

luvnmexsun
Luvnmexsun  (Level: 147.4 - Posts: 711)
Wed, 25th Feb '09 6:55 PM

And here's another goody...illegal drugs ARE taxable, have always been (since 1967 for sure...but I think always). You can lose your home in another way:

An acquaintance was acquitted of possession charges (long story, but was innocent of said charges, I know because I know it was the son)...but charged by the IRS for the taxes according to the street value of the contraband (ok...a whole bunch of marijuana). The stuff was not at the home. No recourse, because with the IRS you are guilty until proven innocent, and this person lost their home to the IRS for taxes.

I assume a really good lawyer, that working people can't afford, may have been able to help, but that's never the case, is it?

It's time for this country to get over "Reefer Madness", the biggest science-fiction ever produced by politics. It's time for this country to look at who really benefits from the "war on drugs" (isn't that like war against your own people?...especially considering alcohol is the most devastating drug in numbers and destruction of health/hearth/lives).

It's time to admit drugs are big business because of "the war on drugs".

Abuse of any drug is bad...and laws can't change abuse - whether its legal or not, obviously...look objectively at what we have now. The drug laws don't stop abuse, the drug laws abuse people...even the poor taxpayer.

It's time to be rational.

Sun


larefamiliaris
Larefamiliaris  (Level: 135.2 - Posts: 877)
Thu, 26th Feb '09 6:49 AM

And just why didn't you run for office ma'am?!



luvnmexsun
Luvnmexsun  (Level: 147.4 - Posts: 711)
Thu, 26th Feb '09 11:23 AM

Why Martin, that is a high compliment indeed! Thank you.

Frankly, I have been recruited at the local level a couple times, but had no time for that while my school was open. Once NCLB killed my school, I almost did. The exposure of my private life that was necessary to do so changed my mind. I just would not do that to my family.

American politics is vicious. I prefer being productive behind the scenes. I can stay positive and at peace with myself without compromising my principles.

Who knows? Maybe my journey will take me there in the future...but for now, I'll stay in the sun.

Shine on...

Sun

lucimoore
Lucimoore  (Level: 183.1 - Posts: 1683)
Thu, 26th Feb '09 1:00 PM

Hidden treasures are the best!

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Sat, 28th Feb '09 11:43 AM

A friend of mine wrote to Attorney General Holder asking if the Obama administration intended to stop the raids on medical marijuana clinics in states where medical marijuana is legal recently received a reply confirming that the current administration does indeed intend to suspend this practice.

oogie54
Oogie54  (Level: 201.2 - Posts: 1120)
Sat, 28th Feb '09 12:22 PM

In the news yesterday the it was announced that the DEA will no longer prosecute medical marijuana clinics. A couple of years ago my uncle was dying from lung cancer,undergoing the chemo treatments,loss of weight,nausea, and could get no relief from the medications he was on. He asked me privately one day if it was possible to find him some marijuana to see if it helped. I continued to provide it for him up until his health declined severely within weeks of his death. I loved my uncle, and did not mind taking the risk to purchase something illegal to ease his suffering, but it would be nice if there were no such restrictions for people who can benefit from the substance.

davidf
Davidf  (Level: 102.1 - Posts: 746)
Sat, 28th Feb '09 12:53 PM

That is a great thing you did Oogie, you cared and helped, that is great

goddess28
Goddess28  (Level: 92.6 - Posts: 5236)
Sat, 28th Feb '09 1:05 PM

You should be able to buy it with a prescription like all the other drugs on the market that are used for medicinal purposes. Good for you Oogie.

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Sat, 28th Feb '09 1:36 PM

Kudos to Oogie

koota
Koota  (Level: 181.7 - Posts: 2100)
Sat, 28th Feb '09 2:02 PM

I can't figure out why Marajuana is illegal anyway. Pot smokers aren't exactly running around creating disturbances and riots. For the most part, they're just sitting around toking, enjoying the scenery and saying "Far OUT, Man!

If marajuana was legalized, the economy would be boosted by pot-inspired munchies. Farmers would sell their products ... Grocery store sales would be stimulated ... The sales for T-shirts and colorful dies would skyrocket ... Blacksmithing would become a popular trade as we begin hammering nails into Peace symbols ... the BBS would become less controversial ...

I don't see a downside.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.3 - Posts: 5314)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 7:13 PM

Except marijuana is considered a gateway drug. I agree, it should be available by prescription for medical purposes.

luvnmexsun
Luvnmexsun  (Level: 147.4 - Posts: 711)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 7:31 PM

Alcohol is by far the most common gateway drug.

kaufman
Kaufman  (Level: 256.8 - Posts: 3936)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 7:37 PM

I'm not sure I buy this whole thing about gateway drugs. Even if people who have tried marijuana have a higher propensity to try harder drugs, that doesn't mean it's necessarily the cause. It could just be that a person with a psychological willingness to experiment with one illegal drug is more willing to experiment with others than someone who would stay away from that firstsubstance. Correlation, but not necessarily causation.

luvnmexsun
Luvnmexsun  (Level: 147.4 - Posts: 711)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 8:14 PM

As usual Ken, you are right. Your summary is now pretty much the accepted view in medicine, psychology and the other related fields. The gateway thing was and is used as the reason to not consider legalization. The real reason is still economics, not rational thought.

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 8:14 PM

I just go on the word of a lot of people who have worked very hard to break the addiction in their lives who say marijuana IS their gateway drug. I just figured they knew what they were talking about.

luvnmexsun
Luvnmexsun  (Level: 147.4 - Posts: 711)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 8:23 PM

I respect that Jank...I'm sure many people started there, but that still doesn't mean it CAUSED further use or abuse. Most don't even think of alcohol as a drug, so they don't think of it as "the gateway" drug...cigarettes as well. But most of them used those first, from my experience and reading at least.

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 9:12 PM

Just for my own curiosity. For someone who never smoked cigarettes, do you think marijuana is a gateway to them? I don't think I've ever heard anyone say.

bokeelia
Bokeelia  (Level: 187.8 - Posts: 114)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 9:22 PM

Calling marijuana a "gateway" drug is a flawed argument. While a large number of heroin users may have started with marijuana a far higher percentage started on milk.

oogie54
Oogie54  (Level: 201.2 - Posts: 1120)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 9:32 PM

I was married to a person who had been addicted to cocaine, but had been "clean" from coke for almost fifteen years. She was a smoker of cigarettes and weed, used alcohol, and had prescriptions for a number of drugs for depression and a bipolar disorder. She had been diagnosed as having an "addictive personality", being with her for several years I found this to be true. It was not just drugs, but every aspect of her life, jobs, relationships, everything, flitting from one thing to the next with a single-minded focus.It was a roller-coaster ride from hell, up one minute, down the next. In that sense, addiction is more about an aberration in brain chemistry or psyche perhaps.

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Sun, 1st Mar '09 9:47 PM

I understand your point, George. But that's apples and oranges. Only a mind-altering drug could be a gateway to a stronger mind-altering drug.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.3 - Posts: 5314)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 1:26 AM

Is marijuana called a gateway drug because it is more accessible? Cheaper? Seen as innocent? The penalties are less severe for possession?

By the way, I'm going by what law enforcement has said.

Imagine my surprise when I took a college course that listed chocolate as a drug!

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 2:58 AM

Gateway implies that it opens the way for harder drug use. By that analogy, seeing as how prescription drugs are now the biggest addiction problem after alcohol, I guess that would make aspirin a gateway drug.





jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 5:27 AM

(But aspirin isn't mind altering, either. By mind altering, I mean it doesn't impair one's ability to think clearly.)

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.3 - Posts: 5314)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 9:48 AM

We do know how mind-altering chocolate can be!! Just ask anyone who can't find any chocolate in the house for their chocolate craving.

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 10:28 AM

I would recommend the book "Marijuana Myths, Marijuana Facts", which is a review of the scientific literature on marijuana, by Lynn Zimmer, PH.D, who at least at the time of the book's initial publication was a Sociology professor, and John Morgan, M.D., who at the time of publication was a practicing physician and professor of Pharmacology. The book was published in 1997. Chapter 4 addresses the myth of marijuana as gateway drug. From the introduction to that chapter:

"Marijuana does not cause people to use hard drugs. What the gateway theory presents as a causal explanation is a statistical association between common and uncommon drugs, an association that changes over time as different drugs increase and decrease in prevalence. Marijuana is the most popular illegal drug in the United States today. Therefore, people who have used less popular drugs, such as heroin, cocaine, and LSD, are likely to have also used marijuana. Most marijuana users never use any other illegal drug. Indeed, for the large majority of people, marijuana is a terminus rather than a gateway drug."

I would bet most American marijuana users also ate at McDonald's before they ever took a toke, but we don't have people claiming that due to the statistical association between having eaten at McDonald's and marijuana smokers that McDonald's is a "gateway" to marijuana. It is a classic logical fallacy to conclude from a statistical association that thing A is the cause of thing B.

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 10:37 AM

The gateway concept in regard to aspirin is that taking aspirin starts in childhood when your mom gives you yummy orange tablets when you don't feel well, then as you get older you take a grownup aspirin, then two, three, then graduate to Excedrin and Advil, going down the slippery slope of fixing yourself with pills, until the day that toothache you can't find a dentist for leads you to take someone else's Tylox and we're off to the races, next thing you know your maid is buying you cigar boxes full of Oxycontins.

It could happen to anybody.

donden
Donden  (Level: 112.5 - Posts: 2127)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 12:05 PM

To be truthful about it, I used weed occasionally for a few years. By that I mean we did the stuff at parties and other informal occasions but I never went out looking for a seller because I just HAD to have some. I quit completely in '92 but not because I was afraid of addiction but because I had quit smoking the legal ones and didn't need the temptation to go back on the dreaded "Marlboro". Believe me when I say I had a lot less control of my mental and physical capacities on alcohol than I did on pot. Some of the people that I did the weed with years ago are very respected citizens and some are professional people and not one of them including myself has "moved up" to anything harder. I must remind you all that I am not including alcohol here,,,,,,,,something that I enjoy using on occasion.

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 12:56 PM

Donden, your's is not an unusual experience. Unfortunately, the full extent of marijuana use among successful, productive adults is rarely used to counter the claims of marijuana critics because of the risks to productive, successful adults who admit to marijuana use.

If the gateway theory was valid, during periods of more marijuana use, you would expect an increase in other illegal drug use. To take some examples: while marijuana use was increasing in the 1960s and 1970s, heroin use was declining. When cocaine use was growing in the early 1980s, marijuana use was declining. Between 1975 and 1995, marijuana use rates fluctuated, while rates for LSD use remained constant. So what illegal drug is marijuana a gateway to?



tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 1:34 PM

On the broader issue of drug prohibition's corrupting influence on the police and judiciary, the following are excerpts from a March 1, 2009 article in the on-line version of the "Detroit Free Press":

"Two Inkster police officers who gave false testimony in a major 2005 cocaine trial have cut a deal with prosecutors to testify that they acted at the direction of Karen Plants, the former head of the Wayne County Prosecutor's drug unit, the cops' attorney has disclosed."

***

"The deal represents a significant development in a months-long investigation of Plants, a onetime star prosecutor who is suspected of orchestrating perjured testimony. The officers would get immunity from prosecution in exchange for their cooperation, their lawyer said.

***
Plants is the subject of a criminal probe by state Attorney General Mike Cox's office, a probe that's expected to conclude in a month or so. It is unclear if prosecutors also are investigating the trial judge who was told of the false testimony but allowed it, anyway.

***

And that was not his only bombshell.

Bullock revealed that three other Inkster cops, whom he also represents, are under investigation in the disappearance of $60,000 in jewelry seized as illicit drug proceeds after the 2005 The cocaine prosecutions of Ricardo Pena and Alexander Aceval came into question when it was learned that Plants privately told Wayne Circuit Judge Mary Waterstone that the cops had lied on the witness stand when they denied knowing the star witness in the cocaine trial, Chad Povish.

In fact, Povish, who denied knowing the cops, was a paid informant who had tipped Inkster police to the drug deal, a circumstance that defense lawyers said they would have used in an effort to discredit Povish to jurors had they known about it."

This is what drug prohibition does to law enforcement and the judicial system.





glennd
Glennd  (Level: 24.3 - Posts: 5)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 10:04 PM

How could you support legalizing Marijuana? You might save some money in taxes but think about the lives that would be lost from lung diseases. In my opinion, cigarettes should be illegal. Marijuana would be going way too far. They could never legalize it.

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 10:22 PM

Pat - but be sure to ask from a safe distance!

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 10:26 PM

Tsk - for every case you can present where somebody did something wrong in the judicial system, I can give you 10 parents whose lives are messed up because their kids are strung out on pot. It makes you unproductive, it makes you think you're smarter than you are, it interferes with doing homework and learning and therefore interferes with your ability to be as productive with your life.

I see no reason to legalize it at all. We can do with out it. Nobody needs it.

I definitely would make an exception to pharmaceutical uses under the overseeing of a doctor, as I would with any legal drug.

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Mon, 2nd Mar '09 10:56 PM

(sorry - guess I should have worded that "exception *for")

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.2 - Posts: 21598)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 1:34 AM

Funny, don't believe I've ever heard of anyone being "strung out on pot". Heard it a bit about heroin but not pot. BTW,Jank, thought you had decided NOT to participate in this discussion after briefly pointing out the one way what I said was wrong., Have heard "never saw never' frequently- Linda

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 8:05 AM

Sorry - I'm not that deep into the drug culture. I just used the words a parent said to me the other day.

About the other, you're exactly right.

So...erase...erase.....erase....erase....

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 2:15 PM

Glenn:

1. First, I am not in favor of using the state's coercive authority to force adults to engage in healthful behavior. My view is that if an adult wants to engage in activities that may harm that person, said person has the right as an autonomous adult to elect to take that risk.

2. In fact, the medical literature DOES NOT support the notion that marijuana use causes fatal lung disease. I refer you to chapter 15 of the book mentioned in my earlier post. that chapter is entitled "Marijuana Smoking and the Lungs". Since that book was published in 1997, further research has failed to show an association between lung cancer and marijuana use. The following is an excerpt from an article in "The Washington Post" of May 26, 2006, which you can find by doing a google search with the terms "marijuana, lung cancer":

"The largest study of its kind has unexpectedly concluded that smoking marijuana, even regularly and heavily, does not lead to lung cancer.

The new findings "were against our expectations," said Donald Tashkin of the University of California at Los Angeles, a pulmonologist who has studied marijuana for 30 years.

"We hypothesized that there would be a positive association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the association would be more positive with heavier use," he said. "What we found instead was no association at all, and even a suggestion of some protective effect."

Federal health and drug enforcement officials have widely used Tashkin's previous work on marijuana to make the case that the drug is dangerous. Tashkin said that while he still believes marijuana is potentially harmful, its cancer-causing effects appear to be of less concern than previously thought."

3. In fact, marijuana has been found effective in combating cancer. The following is an excerpt from an article entitled "Marijuana May Fight lung Tumors" at the on-line site "WebMD". (You can find the full article by googling "Marijuana and lung tumors".) The excerpt:

"April 17, 2007 (Los Angeles) -- Cannabis may be bad for the lungs, but the active ingredient in marijuana may help combat lung cancer, new research suggests.

In lab and mouse studies, the compound, known as THC, cut lung tumor growth in half and helped prevent the cancer from spreading, says Anju Preet, PhD, a Harvard University researcher in Boston who tested the chemical.

While a lot more work needs to be done, β€œthe results suggest THC has therapeutic potential,” she tells WebMD.

Moreover, other early research suggests the cannabis compound could help fight brain, prostate, and skin cancers as well, Preet says."

4. On marijuana and emphysema:

"During a later interview, Tashkin congratulated us on the tip that marijuana used for emphysema produced good results among people we knew.
He had presumed that marijuana aggravated emphysema, but after revewing his evidence found that, except in the rarest of instances, marijuana actually benefitted emphysema sufferers due to the opening and dilation of the bronchial passages.

And so the relief reported to us by cannabis smoking emphysema patients was confirmed.

Marijuana smoke is not unique in its benefits to the lungs. Yerba Santa, Colt's foot, Hoarhound and other herbs have traditionally been smoked to help the lungs.

Tobacco and its associated dangers have so prejudiced people against "smoking" that most people believe cannabis smoking to be as or more dangerous than tobacco. With research banned, these public health and safety facts are unavailable."

You can find this on-line by googling "marijuana, emphysema".

5. As near as I can determine, except for such symptoms as coughing, phlegm, and wheezing -- all non-life threatening -- there is no credible evidence of marijuana having significant health impacts.

The anti-marijuana propaganda that is so frequently spewed is simply not supported by the scientific research.





luvnmexsun
Luvnmexsun  (Level: 147.4 - Posts: 711)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 2:23 PM

The propaganda was so successful, people have a hard time letting go of their prejudices, and so it goes on.

Knowledge is power. Seek with an open mind.

The government has no right to legislate my personal choices.

Sun

tsk9653
Tsk9653  (Level: 113.2 - Posts: 1466)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 2:30 PM

Jank:

I can certainly believe that some parents elect to blame their children's problems on marijuana, but that doesn't mean the parents are correct. (Not to mention that I don't advocate legal sales to minors.) Your new anti-legalization argument is the popular claim that marijuana causes lack of motivation. From the introduction to Chapter 8, "Marijuana, Motivation and performance" in the book "MArijuana Myths, marijuana facts":

"For twenty-five years, researchers have searched for a marijuana-induced amotivational syndrome, and have failed to find it. People who are intoxicated constantly, regardless of the drug, are unlikely to be productive members of society. There is nothing about marijuana specifically that causes people to lose drive and ambition. In laboratory studeies, subjects given high doses of marijuana for several days or several weeks exhibit no decrease in work motivation or productivity. Among working adults, marijuana users tend to earn higher wages than nonusers. College students who use marijuana have the same grades as nonusers. Among high school students, heavy marijuana use is associated with school failure, but school failure usually comes first."

Again, as to those parents who claim that marijuana caused their children to be unmotivated, I suggest that this is another example of falsely ascribing marijuana use as the cause of that lack of motivation. Of course, parents whose children have not turned out as they would have wished are likely to ascribe this to something other than their own shortcomings as parents, and marijuana use is certainly a convenient target, particularly given the federal government's decades long campaign of spreading untrue, anti-marijuana propaganda.

chickfbref1
Chickfbref1  (Level: 120.7 - Posts: 2012)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 6:56 PM

Let's move onto something less controversial...how bout prostitution?

HRH...Me.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.2 - Posts: 21598)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 7:06 PM

Legalize and tax that Too. Don't believe anyone can argue that laws against it has in any way stopped it-just "cleaned it up" a bit LOL Linda

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 7:09 PM

Chick, Holland has them both wrapped up

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 104.7 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 7:11 PM

Prostitution? Almost as interesting as breakfast.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 7:15 PM

Over easy?

chickfbref1
Chickfbref1  (Level: 120.7 - Posts: 2012)
Tue, 3rd Mar '09 10:38 PM

Bwahahahaha....excellent one Sandra...pop out the nose.

TY


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