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1mks
1mks  (Level: 210.8 - Posts: 5883)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 8:30 PM

GIVEN THE AXE - ROYALLY

Loved it!

pepperdoc
Pepperdoc  (Level: 152.5 - Posts: 4286)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 8:33 PM

Just about lost my head over this one.

gypsylady
Gypsylady  (Level: 142.6 - Posts: 6049)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 9:18 PM

Enjoyed the Wordpuzzle! Thanks!

Marilyn...

headylamar
Headylamar  (Level: 150.7 - Posts: 740)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 10:09 PM

Fun puzzle, but I think I found a misspelled word. I've sent a support ticket.

Sploofus Editor
Sploofernatural (Editor)  
Sun, 29th Mar '09 10:34 PM

While the spelling presented in the puzzle is perhaps not a common one, there is evidence to support its use, and the puzzle author justifies and warns of the spelling in the clue to that puzzle. So I think it's best to leave it be, but I'll remind everyone to take note of the clues that appear in this and other puzzles.

lodi
Lodi  (Level: 98.6 - Posts: 2144)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 10:39 PM

I wish I could remember to read the clues but I always always always forget.

alvandy
Alvandy  (Level: 229.1 - Posts: 7560)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 10:58 PM

An educational puzzle and full of history.
I got caught by the spelling variation but recovered after only one "sorry".
[The clue was helpful if I had paid attention to it more closely]

Well written. I've got no axes to grind about it



garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 279.5 - Posts: 6639)
Sun, 29th Mar '09 11:08 PM

Great puzzle especially for brits.
No spelling complaints here.

B

naomi4195
Naomi4195  (Level: 51.7 - Posts: 184)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 2:17 AM

Great puzzle and I didn't run into any spelling problems. Very good. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 8:55 AM

Enjoyed it muchly. What was the spelling variation?

crazy4games
Crazy4games  (Level: 123.0 - Posts: 1020)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 10:05 AM

I'm assuming it was Walter Ralegh. I've only ever seen it spelled Raleigh.

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 279.5 - Posts: 6639)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 10:08 AM

Wow! All the UK books I've ever seen give his name with an I

crazy4games
Crazy4games  (Level: 123.0 - Posts: 1020)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 10:10 AM

Oops. Forgot to say how much I enjoyed the puzzle.

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 10:21 AM

Never seen that nowhere never.

Glad I missed it.

Sploofus Editor
Sploofishy (Editor)  
Mon, 30th Mar '09 10:42 AM

Yes, as was very common at that time, people's spellings of their own names varied considerably (Shakespeare was certainly not the only one). Only once, however, out of all his voluminous works did he actually sign his name as Raleigh. By far the most common way that he spelled it was Ralegh. Numerous recent biographies reflect his personal preference - which generally begin with a discussion of his name - and I believe it has always been more or at least equally as common in England to see it as Ralegh than Raleigh. Americans primarily got stuck on the alternate spelling because of the city.

One theory to account for the highly variable spellings of people's names (and words as well) 400 years ago is that language was still moving from a primarily spoken form of communication to a written one and people were experimenting with spellings to try to get others to pronounce their names correctly when read. I see evidence of this from my own family. When my great-grandfather came to American just prior to the Civil War, he changed the spelling of Jaeger several times to try to get Americans to pronounce his last name properly. He eventually gave up, frustrated that the Americans never did get it right, settling on Yager.

Although there is no way to know for sure, Ralegh seems to have been aiming at the pronunciation "Raw-lay". Evidence for this comes from a poem of a contemporary critic who used his name as a pun in a put down. His wife often spelled their name more along the lines of this pronunciation. However, I have read that it is common in the U.K. to hear his name pronounced "Rally".

clevercloggs
Clevercloggs  (Level: 27.4 - Posts: 1246)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 12:35 PM

Never mind the "i", the bloddy s/z thing did me again. I MUST start to notice those.

bigdavy
Bigdavy  (Level: 131.3 - Posts: 529)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 12:36 PM

Sploofishy, thanks for the details and interesting info

davidf
Davidf  (Level: 102.1 - Posts: 746)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 1:09 PM

Those English hey, any excuse for a public execution, shame on them

thedon1
Thedon1  (Level: 3.0 - Posts: 45)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 1:11 PM

at least we will not have davidf to deal with

davidf
Davidf  (Level: 102.1 - Posts: 746)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 1:13 PM

I do enjoy your Aussie sense of humour, it is so funny it almost turns 360 degrees on itself and becomes obsolete

surreyman
Surreyman  (Level: 260.5 - Posts: 2770)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 2:28 PM

Everything Sploofishy says is correct, except that the most common Brit pronunciation these days is as in 'Old Mother'.

papajensai
Papajensai  (Level: 192.9 - Posts: 1025)
Mon, 30th Mar '09 2:36 PM

Enjoyed the puzzle, and came that close to reporting a spelling error when the clue bounced back in my field of vision. Very clever. Good thing I don't care if I tried it three ways before I got the way you wanted it. I mean, the way he wanted it, of course.


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