You are not signed in (Login or Join Free)   |   Help
Sploofus Trivia
Trivia GamesCommunityLeaderboardsTournaments
MySploofus
You are here:  Home  >>  Chat Forums  >>  The Salty Dog  >>  View Chat Message

View Chat Message



Pages:  1    


oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Mon, 17th Aug '09 8:36 PM

HEALTHCARE COVERAGE IIN BC, CANADA

Universal Medical Coverage in British Columbia, Canada

MSP covers basic medical coverage, such as doctors visits, ER visits, hospitalization, prescriptions after your deductible is reached (the deductible is based on your income &/or age i.e.: those over 65 have a zero deductible, so pay nothing), dental is covered based on income, eye exams & vision care is free to those under 18 or over 65, if you are between the ages of 19 & 64 it is free if you are referred by a doctor. Physiotherapy, chiropractic therapy, massage therapy, etc is covered based on your income, medical supplies such as insulin pumps & prosthetic devices are covered under most circumstances.

Doctors are paid at set rate for visits & procedures which are negotiated between the Provincial government and the BC College of surgeons. They are not allowed to charge you an extra fee. Doctors may opt out of the MSP but must tell you ahead of time & then you would pay their fees & then submit a request for reimbursement for the portion that MSP allows. Very few doctors opt out, as they don’t want to pay for the extra bookwork or try to collect from patients who can’t pay, not to mention that very few patients are willing to see a doctor who wants his money upfront.

Prescriptions are covered based on a list developed by the BC College of Surgeons for your specific injury or illness. Normally this means generic drugs, when available or the lower costing drugs that have been around for a while. Your doctor can request coverage for newer or more expensive drugs when he feels they are needed & this is normally approved & very quickly (my son received an experimental drug when the standard treatments for Colitis had failed, with no problem). You may also pay the difference in cost from a generic drug to a brand name, which is the same policy as the private insurers.

You may go to any doctor you wish, of course, if you live in a remote community, which many Canadians do, there probably isn’t too much choice. Big country, tiny population. If you need to be referred to a specialist, you can ask for a certain one & your doctor will do that. If the specialist you need is more than 60 kilometers away they will subsidize your travel costs (mileage, ferry fees, meal allowance, etc.). Under unusual circumstances they may pay for you receiving treatment in another province or in the US (A local girl was flown to the Mayo Clinic for treatment for a very rare disease at no cost to her family, though funds were raised to help pay for her parents to accompany her).

We do have long waiting lists for certain procedures but if you need emergency care you go to the top of the list (my cousin was waiting for a hip replacement, due to be done in 6 months, fell one night, broke his hip & was air lifted to Vancouver & operated on the next morning). Much of the waiting lists are caused not by lack of funding by the government but by lack of doctors & anesthesiologists available to do the procedures. Darn doctors, sometimes get sick their selves or worse, take a vacation (I’m, just kidding Slicko & RJ). On Vancouver Island the wait to get into certain specialists can be quite long because this is an area that is popular for retirees from across Canada. BC has a higher percentage of citizens over the age of 65 than any other province. The Federal government does give BC a subsidy for this but it isn’t near enough. I imagine certain States, like Florida, California & Arizona will have this problem if you get nationalized health care. Please don’t take this to mean I’m advocating restricted care for seniors, but it does need to be taken into account by your government. Federal funds paid can’t just be determined based on population stats alone.

In addition to MSP you or you employer may purchase private medical coverage for prescriptions, dental, eye glasses, etc. These costs are fairly reasonable for employers with group plans. When Ed had his company plan in 2007, this cost his employer about 200 dollars per month. When he lost his job this price jumped to 458 dollars per month & the coverage was less & pre-existing conditions were not covered. Employer group plans have no pre-existing condition exclusions. These benefits paid for by an employer are added to your gross income & are taxable both Federally & Provincially.

We also have Pharmanet, which I think is an excellent tool for both patients & doctors. PharmaNet is the province-wide network that links all B.C. pharmacies to a central set of data systems. Every prescription dispensed in B.C. is entered into PharmaNet. In 2007, over 47 million prescriptions were processed on PharmaNet and the system flagged more than 24 million potential drug interactions. PharmaNet users include community pharmacies, hospital pharmacies, emergency departments, medical practices, the College of Pharmacists of B.C. and the College of Physicians & Surgeons of B.C.
Helps to prevent accidental duplication of prescriptions and prescription fraud
Protects you from drug interactions and dosage errors
Promotes the cost-effective use of drugs
Offers authorized health professionals the comprehensive medication information they need to give you high quality care

In B.C., premiums are payable for MSP coverage and are based on family size and income. The monthly rates are:
$54 for one person
$96 for a family of two
$108 for a family of three or more

Regular premium assistance offers subsidies ranging from 20 to 100 per cent, based on an individual's net income (or a couple's combined net income) for the preceding tax year, less deductions for age, family size and disability. If the resulting amount referred to as "adjusted net income" is $28,000 or below, a subsidy is available.

The current adjusted net income thresholds are:
$20,000 - 100 percent subsidy
$22,000 - 80 percent subsidy
$24,000 - 60 percent subsidy
$26,000 - 40 percent subsidy
$28,000 - 20 percent subsidy

Temporary premium assistance offers a 100 per cent subsidy for a short term based on unexpected financial hardship.

I hope I covered all the questions, if not, just ask & I’ll try to get the information. I posted this after receiving some requests by PM & the subject came up on a Salty Dog thread. I should add that I am mostly satisfied with our medical care but it’s not quite as good as it used to be.





sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 4:03 AM

Thanks for your post! Sounds like a good and fair system. I hope we're able to pass something similar here in the states. So many have lost health insurance due to layoffs in the last few years, and can't afford private insurance, or now work in jobs that don't provide benefits. These folks get their care in ERs. Having a car wreck or serious illness means ruined credit, sometimes bankruptcy. People who had had insurance all their lives, and many feel ashamed. Sad country in this regard.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 7:06 AM

Randy lives there so she knows from a patient view This is just the view of their medical guy http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,539943,00.html

jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 7:11 AM

In case anyone doesn't like to look at Fox News links:

"Dr. Anne Doig, the incoming president of the Canadian Medical Association, said her country’s health care system is “sick” and “imploding,” the Canadian Press reported.

“We know there must be change,” Doig said in a recent interview. “We’re all running flat out, we’re all just trying to stay ahead of the immediate day-to-day demands.”

Canada’s universal health care system is not giving patients optimal care, Doig added. When her colleagues from across the country gather at the CMA conference in Saskatoon Sunday, they will discuss changes that need to be made, she said.

“We all agree the system is imploding, we all agree that things are more precarious than perhaps Canadians realize,” she said."

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 7:22 AM

"Sick and imploding" Sounds familiar. Ours certainly is. No one said that Canadian health care was perfect, but I think we can learn from the other modern countries of the world who have some form of universal healthcare (that would be everyone except us), and devise a system that's uniquely American and would work for the US.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 7:37 AM

Don't believe anyone thinks our system does not need work. People know that when government gets in they never get out though. Medicare and Medicaid are broke . Am a little leary of the seed money to co-ops as that gets govenments foot i the door. Andy, from the litle i can find to read, France prides itself of being different from Britain. How are they different and does France cover all? The one Globe article I could find s in the Boston globe said something about some kind of private insurers controlling funds-don't know just asking

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 7:42 AM

Good question to Andy, Linda. These countries must be doing something right. Western Europe's standard of living is equal and in some cases higher than ours. As well as their life expectancy. Both.

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 8:23 AM

Doing something different, Sandy. Sounds fine, except that there apparently aren't enough doctors to meet the demand.

I'd be curious as to the cost of a doctor visit at his office there. Here it is about $31 set by the state, but doctors receive medical education free. Where I used to live in Chicago I think it is five times that today.

I'd also be curious as to limits of malpractice awards there, if any. Or do doctors face the same hazards as they do in the USA which leads to excessive testing?

How much is the government kicking in per capita?

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 8:48 AM

The Globe article said France had done major tort reform so doctors had very little chance of being sued. it also noted that their educations were paid in full which means a doc starting out is debt fre-no student loans or anything The article also said very strict on qualifying for medical school-guessing no affirmative action.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 8:59 AM

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92419273 here is another article . People who want a system like France cannot expect cheap and EVERYONE pays. Note that employers say they hire fewer folks because of cost. Would be interested in how France deals with illegals and care. O'reilly says Switzerland's syste is good and fair but most people there work. The Swiss actively discourage immigration-next to impossible to become a citizen tthere. They run as in parts of Africa discouraging folks from coming-dont think the Swiss would pas the ACLU test

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 9:05 AM

Employers in France are reluctant to hire because of the huge payroll taxes and because it is so hard to fire employees.

Affirmative action should come to France's prestigious professional schools and I think it is. That's not racial quotas, Linda. It is admitting students of comparable talent with possibly lesser grades.

Immigration? The North Africans Maghrebins? Barriers are going up - language, for example.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 9:42 AM

Thed "talking heads" as Fudy calls themn are speculating that te public option will come out but be put back in during committee. The Dems have a vasst majoriy and can use this but because of the Byrd ammendment might face legal challenges-there will be consequences for forcing folks to accept something they don't wanthttp://blog.buzzflash.com/analysis/875

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 9:55 AM

No way, Linda.

They don't have the votes, and this WH needs a victory in the worst way.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 10:11 AM

http://www.thedailyshow.com/ when even Stewart mocks him in the "medicine brawl" video-you know he has a message problem

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 12:31 PM

I suspect that part of Dr. Anne Doig's promotion of private medical is doublespeak for doctors wanting to charge more money. We already have some private medical facilities which are taking away anaesthesiologists from our hospitals, a speciality we are severely short of, thus causing further lineups for operations in the government facilities. I guess that looks good if you need an operation & are able to get to the head of the line because you have a lot of money but the average citizen can't afford it. The Federal government had previously disallowed this but our current Conservative government isn't & it's a slippery slope. We'll see if the Canadian public stands for it when the next election rolls around. After all, Canadians did overwhelming voted for naming Tommy Douglas, the father of universal healthcare, as our greatest Canadian a couple of years ago. We love our national healthcare.
There is no doubt that there will be more & more challenges to giving quality healthcare in all the Western nations as the baby-boomers enter their golden years. People are living longer due to new expensive medical procedures & costly drugs. Better quality food, vaccines & healthier work conditions over the last 60 or so years are also a big factor, though I've read that average life expectancy will probably drop in the future due to the poor eating & exercise habits of the current generation. I would personally like to see more effort going into to researching preventive measures like vitamin research & getting our food back to a more natural state, sans antibiotics & growth hormones. I know that MRSA (Superbug) is thought to be the result of the combination of oversubscribing antibiotics, antibiotic soap & the overuse of antibiotics in food animals. People being unable to afford to purchase enough antibiotics is also a factor. My research (that's what I have) on the subject says we are dangerously close to antibiotics failing entirely, couple that with the emergence of treatment resistant TB & we may not have to worry about overpopulation or old age.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:02 PM

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2009/aug/18/national-health-vs-usa/ conservative source-grant you. What strikes me is that Brits and Canadians praise their systems because they are "FREE". Nothing is free. These systems simply place a bigger burden on the most successful in society. When did it become a crime to be rich? I don't know the answer but get really tired of "Free and Excellent" mantra

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:04 PM

While I await the answers to my questions, Randy, all can ponder this

http://www.vancouversun.com/story_print.html?id=1878506&sponsor

Apparently all is not well in BC.

bobolicios
Bobolicios  (Level: 118.8 - Posts: 1745)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:14 PM

This is to Jan once again total respect for you as a Christian and for your kindness. In all do respect I once again disagree with your conservative views. In a perfect world with caring people like yourself we would need no government backed socialized health care. That is clearly not the case with sooooo many people either underinsured or not insured we need health care assistance in this country. I can't wait until I am 65 for health care, I know I need a primary physcian and I need some a physical, I have high blood pressure and I am sure I probably need lipitor or other medications for plaque build up or I might have a heart attack before I am 65. So what am I supposed to do die? I wish I lived in Canada away from all the raging conservatives who would rather have people like me die than possibly have higher taxes to support health care. Not to mention the fact that I need dental care and my vision has gone beyond the reader glasses prescription. I am sometimes ashamed to be an Amercian. Cougar I envy you Canadians, sounds like even though there may be some flaws it is fair superior than our system.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:26 PM

Senattr Conrad said the public option is a no-go so foolish to chase that rabbit. There are ideas out there for giving vouchers to folks who need help to but health insurance-just one of the ideas out there which make some kind of sense to me-works with food stamps

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:30 PM

Bobo, do you not qualify for Medicaid?

Are there not clinics available to you?

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:31 PM

Andy, we have to pay for the 2010 Winter Olympics somehow, don't ya know. Our current Provincial government is cutting budgets to everything. The middle class in BC is currently unemployed thus not paying taxes but we're still throwing a big party, the costs of which, has spiralled out of control. The debacle that was the Montreal Olympics of 1976, which the people of Quebec just finished paying for (also thrown during a recession), will pale in comparison. You might also like to research the story of how our current government is under investigation by the RCMP for destroying court ordered documents in a case involving the sell off of a government owned railway for less than the value. They were just blocked by the Federal Energy Commission from purchasing a power plant at far over the estimated value & establishing privately owned run of the river power plants that required our government owned hydro company to purchase power we didn't need to sell to the States, at a higher price than we could sell it. I advise not vacationing here, there's a funny fishy smell everywhere

bobolicios
Bobolicios  (Level: 118.8 - Posts: 1745)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:41 PM

No Andy I DONT qualify for Medicaid. When I was unemployed and applied for assistance I was told I did not qualify. You have to be under 18 or over 65 to qualify for medicaid. You can't get assistance in the state I live in unless you have children. You can only receive food stamps. There are no free clinics in the state of NC. They do have health dept. but there is a three month waiting list. I am sure the care there is less than desirable, so please spare me your lasse faire doctiine on capitalism. I don't need to hear anymore of that rhetoric from you. I was replying to Cougar's thread.

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:44 PM

Andy, in answer to your question about lawsuits, I'm sure malpractice insurance would be cheaper here. While people do sue, it is not nearly as often as in the States & I suspect the frivolous ones don't make it through our courts. I do support you on your idea of tort reform. There, I agreed with you, doesn't that just make your day

Sorry I can't support the above comments with research but I've got a double batch of stewed tomatoes to process & my energy is fading fast.

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:55 PM

Bobo, I am sorry. I thought Medicaid specifically was a means-tested program. Perhaps RJ or Gary can give you better advice than I.

I wish we had today a program that gave you low cost access to health care.

I'm afraid Obama really botched up this effort (he's lost control of the subject), and therefore it may be a while till some needed changes are put in place.

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:57 PM

Thanks for that, stew your tomatoes (which l love), and come back with more info another day.

BTW how much does a family pay?

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 1:59 PM

Whatever and if anything is passed, it will not be effective until 2013 but the taxing to pay will go into effect immediately. I see this like the FICA thing where funds were used for other things. Believe every state has county facilities often inferor but they cannot refuse care-again hate the mantra "Free and Cheap"

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 2:00 PM

Should ave been "Free and Excellent" no such thing

collioure
Collioure  (Level: 105.1 - Posts: 9952)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 2:04 PM

Of course, nothing was to happen until Barack had been re-elected.

Of course, if he doesn't get untracked pretty soon, he can forget all about another term.

caramel1
Caramel1  (Level: 128.4 - Posts: 21605)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 2:50 PM


jank0614
Jank0614  (Level: 67.1 - Posts: 4597)
Tue, 18th Aug '09 6:53 PM

Bobo - come to Texas! When I went back to college to get my teaching degree and didn't get to work, I had all the dental care I needed at a clinic - I think I paid like $15.

We're a good state!

bobolicios
Bobolicios  (Level: 118.8 - Posts: 1745)
Wed, 19th Aug '09 1:22 PM

Maybe I should, if they don't secede from US! No thank you for the invite I know health and dental does vary from state to state. Jan like I said have utmost respect and appreciation for you even if we don't always see eye to eye. I know your heart is in the right place. Cougar with all its flaws it is still a better system than having no care at all. I am sorry health care should be based on your income. Wealthy people don't have anymore right to good health care than a poor person. I guess that is just the socialist egalitarian in me talking.


Pages:  1    



Copyright © 2003-2016 Sploofus Holdings LLC.  All rights reserved.
Legal Notice & Privacy Statement  |  Link to Sploofus