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asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 7:47 PM

WORDS, WORDS, WORDS!

I mentioned in another thread how much I like the word "foment." I think that's partly because its use is so specific and partly because it's used infrequently enough to catch one's attention yet often enough to be widely understood.

I also like the fact that "insipid" is the opposite of "sapid" (flavorful).

And I like that "supersede" is the only word in the English language that ends in "sede" (or so I've been told).

I often get a kick out of words that show up on WRs and WMs--especially the old-fashioned ones. I would love to give examples, but they seem to escape into the ethosphere before my failing brain has time to grab on to them.

I'd love to hear others' favorite (or least favorite) words. I'm sure there have been similar threads in the past, but danged if I have enough patience to scroll back to find them .

bigmama60
Bigmama60  (Level: 95.2 - Posts: 6648)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 7:55 PM

I like foray; especially when I'm hungry

pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 8:02 PM

the word, patellectomy, which is the removal of the kneecap --- I love the way it rolls off the tongue.

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 8:12 PM

Ouch!

When I was a child, my sibs and I loved "defenestrate"

bigmama60
Bigmama60  (Level: 95.2 - Posts: 6648)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 8:42 PM

When I heard Oui Oui in French I thought something else was meant.

tuzilla
Tuzilla  (Level: 134.1 - Posts: 3779)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 9:10 PM

I like coprolite. I have on more than one occasion complimented a manager on his acute coprolite form...sounds real managerial to me.

mrbojangles
Mrbojangles  (Level: 16.6 - Posts: 231)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 9:26 PM

I like the three "E's" eclectic, ebiquitious, and esoteric.

But then I'm different, everywhere, and understood by only a few.

carreau
Carreau  (Level: 237.0 - Posts: 140)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 10:06 PM

One of my favorites is brandish. How many things can you brandish. In newspaper reports it's generally a revolver.

clevercloggs
Clevercloggs  (Level: 27.4 - Posts: 1246)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 10:16 PM

Pennwoman
the word, patellectomy, which is the removal of the kneecap --- I love the way it rolls off the tongue.

What a strange way to have a kneecap removed. I've always loved the word "sarcophagus".

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 10:28 PM

I've liked the simple word 'cleave' since I heard that it is possibly the only word in our language with two definitions, which are opposites. (Cleavage is nice, also.)

And as a math teacher, I've always like 'reciprocal.' If you say it three times, fast, it sounds like something Foghorn Leghorn would use.

clevercloggs
Clevercloggs  (Level: 27.4 - Posts: 1246)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 10:45 PM

M48ortal
I've liked the simple word 'cleave' since I heard that it is possibly the only word in our language with two definitions, which are opposites. (Cleavage is nice, also.)

Nice ? You are a master of the understatement !!!!

bbear
Bbear  (Level: 161.7 - Posts: 2301)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 10:51 PM

We have a couple down here in Louisiana. One of them is

--conversating or conversate. Love that one.

--Making (as in making groceries)

--orientate (as in I tried to orientate him to where he was going.

--okay. (as in "how are you? I'm doing well. Thanks for asking.") (I'm not kidding about this one. folks pass each other on the street; one says "okay" and the other says "okay" and conversation over (or you are done conversating). Too hot for real talk.



smokydevil
Smokydevil  (Level: 163.0 - Posts: 5381)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 11:04 PM

Here's the word I like: Floccinaucinihilipilification


And here's where I first heard it: http://www.clipland.com/Live/video/4869

fudypatootie
Fudypatootie  (Level: 197.3 - Posts: 1302)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 11:29 PM

I like the word "plethora." I love how it sounds.

One of my brothers has 3 words that he doesn't like at all and he really hates them when you put them together....moist, succulent and panties.



garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 11:35 PM

I've always liked the elegance of chaos and havoc -- virtually unique formats in English.

On a slightly less charming note, chlamydia and chancre are also intriguingly structured words.

mplaw51
Mplaw51  (Level: 179.5 - Posts: 1582)
Mon, 24th Aug '09 11:39 PM

I've always liked the word "morass". My father loved the word "antediluvian". He got such a kick in his later years telling young people that they were antediluvian. He cracked himself up. He's the guy that introduced me to words and taught me to love them. Sounds silly, but I could get lost in a dictionary. (I'm really not a boring person...honest!)

smokydevil
Smokydevil  (Level: 163.0 - Posts: 5381)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 12:20 AM

Fudy: You ever seen this scene from Three Amigos? It comes to mind everytime I hear the word "plethora". Now that word makes me laugh!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mTUmczVdik

fudypatootie
Fudypatootie  (Level: 197.3 - Posts: 1302)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 12:25 AM

I have seen that movie, but it's been years, and alas, my dial up is too slow to check out the video you posted.

I love that part where they discuss how you can tell a plane is a mail plane...

titansgal
Titansgal  (Level: 17.6 - Posts: 35)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 12:27 AM

Syzygy. I love how it sounds and makes me feel when I spell it outloud.

smokydevil
Smokydevil  (Level: 163.0 - Posts: 5381)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 12:28 AM

Dang. Well, here's a quote from that part of the movie culled off the internet anyways:

Jefe: I have put many beautiful pinatas in the storeroom, each of them filled with little suprises.

El Guapo: Many pinatas?

Jefe: Oh yes, many!

El Guapo: Would you say I have a plethora of pinatas?

Jefe: A what?

El Guapo: A *plethora*.

Jefe: Oh yes, you have a plethora.

El Guapo: Jefe, what is a plethora?

Jefe: Why, El Guapo?

El Guapo: Well, you told me I have a plethora. And I just would like to know if you know what a plethora is. I would not like to think that a person would tell someone he has a plethora, and then find out that that person has *no idea* what it means to have a plethora.

Jefe: Forgive me, El Guapo. I know that I, Jefe, do not have your superior intellect and education. But could it be that once again, you are angry at something else, and are looking to take it out on me?

Not as funny....but best I could do.

P.S.: that is a good part.


lisap369
Lisap369  (Level: 61.1 - Posts: 992)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 2:02 AM

Love this thread.... thank you

Consciousness,,, love the word, and the state lol.. but always seemed hard for me to pronounce.. weird lol

aquamar
Aquamar  (Level: 179.0 - Posts: 910)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 2:47 AM

Love the word connoisseur because it sounds so classy and makes me think of James Bond.

madamec8
Madamec8  (Level: 82.6 - Posts: 893)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 5:32 AM

I like the word 'segue' -- my best conversations are often loaded with them.

To make a transition from one thing to another smoothly and without interruption: The conversation segued from travel anecdotes to food.

The operative words are smoothly and without interruption.

achad
Achad  (Level: 204.2 - Posts: 661)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 5:46 AM

Free beer.



m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 7:23 AM

One of my students asked how to pronounce 'ennui,' so I showed him one of the internet sites where you type in a word and it says it for you. A voice like Maurice Chevalier's said 'awn-wee.' The student just sat and pushed the 'pronounce' button over and over until it became, well... boring.

Humungous

Quietus - Grandma used to say, "I'll slap a quietus on you."

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 10:18 AM

Oooooh, Grandma sounds tough!!

Love all the fave words everyone has posted.

My brother worked in an office with a young woman who liked to bare her "assets" and operated under the assumption that every male throughout the building was salivating over her. She took great pleasure in slighting those males deemed beneath her. One day, she got into a debate with someone about whether she was a nice person. She turned to my brother and asked him whether she was. He replied, "I would absolutely say you're meretricious, yes." And she beamed, delighted that he had backed her up. (meretricious=of or relating to prostitutes or prostitution)

Loved that

monkeynips13
Monkeynips13  (Level: 21.5 - Posts: 647)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 11:26 AM

I recently heard the word plutoed on an episode of "Ace of Cakes" and have been waiting for an opportunity to use it ever since. Apparently, shortly after Pluto was stripped of its planet status, wordsmiths adopted the term "to pluto" to describe the demotion or devaluation of a person or object. It was declared word of the year in 2006. I wonder if it ever got any street cred, as in "Dude, you've been plutoed!" Here's a link to the word of the year article below.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16529756/

larefamiliaris
Larefamiliaris  (Level: 135.2 - Posts: 877)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 11:57 AM

Discombobulated. (My Grandma's favourite word - ironically once the Alzheimers took hold!)

Disgruntled. Friend of mine used to delight in telling anyone who asked how 'gruntled' he felt...

Lickspittle. Vastly underused word in the world of politics.

Rambunctious. Best. American. Word. Ever!

pennwoman
Pennwoman  (Level: 155.2 - Posts: 2478)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 6:35 PM

Jocularity
I remember a MASH episode where Father M, said "Jocularity! Jocularity!" It still makes me laugh.

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 6:58 PM

When our kids were small, the family dog had a litter of pups. We kept two and found homes for the rest. The two we kept were named "Fat Baby" (which was lazy), and "Rambunctious" (which definitely wasn't lazy.)

lowiq
Lowiq  (Level: 205.0 - Posts: 1943)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 7:04 PM

I took a liking to the french word for "scapegoat"...bouc-emissaire.

(Not that there's anything wrong with scapegoat!)

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 7:59 PM

Since we're on foreign words, I fancy "gezellig". Dutch word, roughly translating to "cozy" When my friend from Holland was here, he told me that my house was "gezellig", and it was a nice compliment. Sitting with your friends by the fire, having a cup of coffee is also gezellig. Pronounced just how it looks.

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 9:00 PM

Hoity-toity and hoi polloi ain't half bad...

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 10:20 PM

Anything with all five vowels in it is automatically 'interesting'
It could be a name -- Julia Roberts Shia Labeouf

Of course the ones with the vowels in the right order (abstemious arsenious facetious) or wrong order (unoriental unoccidental uncomplimentary) have special charms.

I'm guessing other word-hounds out there notice this too.

pepperdoc
Pepperdoc  (Level: 152.5 - Posts: 4286)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 10:47 PM

I've been waiting YEARS to be able to do this:

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

Woo hoo! Learned it in junior high and have NEVER been able to use it in conversation.

This has made my day!!

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 10:53 PM

Barry, you reminded me of when Shelley Fabares' character told Donna Reed, "Mother! I'm not being facetious..." Just because of the way she said it I had to look it up.

Still one of my favorite words.

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 11:52 PM

Rubenesque. Because I am, and it sounds so much better than "heavyset".

osuzannacollage
Osuzannacollage  (Level: 132.1 - Posts: 1299)
Tue, 25th Aug '09 11:58 PM


A good while back I read that the word "moss" was the most beautiful sounding word in the English language. Not so sure about that, but it was interesting nonetheless.

My daughter loves to use the word "random" all the time.

salzypat
Salzypat  (Level: 156.5 - Posts: 5316)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 1:15 AM

I'm sort of partial to cattywampus.

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 2:20 AM

You've covered most of my favourite ones, did anyone above say fracas, so much classier than fight. Donnybrook is a fine substitute, as well.

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 8:23 AM

Balderdash is also quite nice.

Words I don't like: obscene, gobs, pustule, sickly, hirsute.

zeedee
Zeedee  (Level: 224.7 - Posts: 1088)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 10:53 AM

I love finding a word that gives a name to a concept I never named before. I was tickled with the word "schadenfreude" when I came across it for the first time: pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others. Not a nice thing, perhaps, but now I recognize when a person is showing their schadenfreude.

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 10:58 AM

Whimmydiddle.

I make an old Appalachian toy called a Gee-haw Whimmydiddle (Sometimes called a hooey stick)

Gee means right, Haw means left, and Whimmydiddle just sounds cool. I've looked it up in three dictionaries and can't find it. When I google it, I get a picture of the thing I make. I think it's related to "whimsical."

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 12:36 PM

Oh Mike, you set me to smiling with that one. We had one when I was growing up, just called it a hooey stick but I like Gee-haw Whimmydiddle, even better. It always came out when we had a hooey stick virgin in the house to bedazzle & provided hours of laughs. My Mom actually used it for as a litmus test for her 4 daughters dates, if they didn't find their inability to make it work funny, she advised us to move on. Thinking back now, it was a pretty good indicator of someones character. Thanks

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 12:45 PM

Re the stick.
I'd never heard of it but just gone looking on the net; sounds fun --and just the sort of science that baffles me.
Thank you!

fudypatootie
Fudypatootie  (Level: 197.3 - Posts: 1302)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 1:04 PM

Pepper! I had to write the word Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis 40 times when I was in junior high as a punishment for talking in class. I guess the teacher thought I wouldn't want to be verbose after that, but I was still getting in trouble for talking all through high school.

Mom and Dad always liked to mix words up. One of Dad's favorites was "beautimus." I liked when he called me that.

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 1:59 PM

Come to think of it, I also like "fudypatootie"

papajensai
Papajensai  (Level: 193.3 - Posts: 1025)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 2:27 PM

Without considering the meaning, but simply the sound it makes, have you ever really considered the word cuspidor?

pepperdoc
Pepperdoc  (Level: 152.5 - Posts: 4286)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 2:46 PM

Oh, Fudy, my sympathies!!!

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 3:12 PM

Cuspidor sounds really threatening--like some evil spirit in Harry Potter.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 3:21 PM

I think it sounds like a dentist with a cape!

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 3:44 PM

The cuspidor dispatches the bull with the cusp of his picador.

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 3:53 PM

Or yanks the bicuspid with a flourish!

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 4:00 PM

Or is highly gifted in the art of profanity.

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 4:26 PM

A cuspidor works for a troubador, maybe composing insults.

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 4:28 PM

I've just remembered:
Lobster Cuspidor is homard a L'Americaine;

We read recently and with some disgust about the habit in the Deep South about spitting into a cup. On a related theme the lobster is apprently cooked in tobacco.



bushyfox
Bushyfox  (Level: 174.4 - Posts: 2403)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 4:59 PM

I was amazed to learn yesterday that the word "Honcho" has Japanese origins, meaning "hanchō squad" or "group leader".

I woulda thought it was Spanish.....!!
~Bev

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 5:27 PM

How could I have forgotten?
The three wise men were Balthasar Melchar and Cuspidor.



asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Wed, 26th Aug '09 6:20 PM

I *thought* I was on the cuspidor of coming up with a clever response, but then it went away.

koota
Koota  (Level: 181.9 - Posts: 2104)
Thu, 27th Aug '09 5:09 PM

While you guys were stuck on "cuspidor" I was off researching the Gee-Haw Whimmy Diddle and found this explanation. "Why is this called a GeeHaw Whimmy Diddle? It is a whimsical (whimmy) device that you diddle with. In bygone days, people trained their horses to turn right or left when they called out, "Gee" or "Haw." To make your demonstration more mysterious, call out "Gee" and make the gadget spin one way, then call out "Haw" and make it spin the other way." from this site: http://bobscrafts.com/bobstuff/geehaw.htm Now I want one.

My favorite word? Onomatopoeia Lots of vowels, fun to say.

Thanks for this thread. It's a real hoot.


asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Thu, 27th Aug '09 9:12 PM

Now, "diddle" is a funny word. It makes me think of the scene in "About a Boy" in which Hugh Grant's character sputters, "Are you accusing me of [sputter, sputter] DIDDLING your son???!!"

At least that's how I recall the scene. Pretty good movie!

zeedee
Zeedee  (Level: 224.7 - Posts: 1088)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 5:44 AM

As an example of a word that (to me at least) does not sound like what it means, I would submit "crepuscular" which sounds like it might describe a seeping wound rather than referring to something as lovely as twilight.

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 7:37 AM

Borborygmus on the other hand is onomatopoeic.

mplaw51
Mplaw51  (Level: 179.5 - Posts: 1582)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 8:41 AM

Lodi mentioned the word hullabaloo on another thread which reminded of the word brouhaha. I've always loved that word. Many threads turn into a brouhaha on Salty Dog but this one hasn't!

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 11:05 AM

Just read through this again and if anyone mentioned "oxymoron" I didn't see it. I'm tempted to start a new thread just to see what oxymorons this clever group enjoys.

Related Proper nouns that became verbs:
Bork - to attack someone with their own resume.
Bjork - to dress someone in a swan http://shelovestoknit.typepad.com/she_loves_to_knit/images/bjork.jpg
Bjorn - to smack someone with a tennis racket

suzer22
Suzer22  (Level: 165.6 - Posts: 1982)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 1:31 PM

I've always felt that pulchritudinous would be the way a pugilist looked after a fight, and yet, it means 'beautiful'!

A word I seem to use a lot lately is 'obsequious'. With characters in a play, very often one has more power than the other and I always seem to be trying to get the other one to behave in a more obsequious fashion. To me the word expresses exactly the tone they need, but my high school students just stare blankly at me.

Mrbojangels also mentioned three of my favorites calling them the three e's. But ubiquitous is spelled with a u. I do greatly enjoy e words, like: esoteric, eclectic, effervescent, ecstatic, exotic (I like to use them to describe myself )

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 1:57 PM

I've always been partial to steatopygous, as a word, but I'm not sure I'd admire it in a person...maybe Jennifer Lopez?

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 8:11 PM

I had to look that one up, Barry

Reminded me of a friend's experience waiting for a subway train one day. A woman walked by and the man next to my friend said, "Mmm, mmm, mmm. Would you look at that bofus!!!" My friend looked at him quizzically and the man replied, "Yes Sir, that woman has a behind big enough for bofus!"

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 8:32 PM

J-Lo is more often described as callipygous, except her fans would probably prefer honky-tonk bedonkadonk.
Either way...

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Sat, 29th Aug '09 8:47 PM

J-Lo has fans??

felix
Felix  (Level: 109.3 - Posts: 2500)
Sun, 30th Aug '09 8:15 AM

The word chime has a ring to it. Or so it seems.

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Sun, 30th Aug '09 8:34 AM

Cremaster. Now, there's an uplifting word you don't see every day.

alvandy
Alvandy  (Level: 229.7 - Posts: 7570)
Sun, 30th Aug '09 9:22 AM

One that pops into mind is "pontificate"

I think it might be prominent in some Salty Dog threads.




asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Sun, 30th Aug '09 1:42 PM

You just taught me a new one, Smoke

Other words I like (mostly for sound):
squiggle and squiggly
pax
fatuous
calculating
silly prat
wobbly
truculent (or is that one I don't like? there's a fine line sometimes...)
jitney
flannelmouthed (speaking unclearly)
cogent
voracious
cackle
crackle and crackling

Don't like:
juicy
treakly
freak or freakish
butt
saliva (but OK with salivate)
spittle

Outright DESPISE:
ideate and ideation
incentivize



surreyman
Surreyman  (Level: 260.9 - Posts: 2770)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 5:36 AM

Sort of associated, and might amuse:

An awful gaffe in a press release last week by the office of Stephen Harper, Canada's Prime Minister, demonstrated how ingrained putting Q & U together is in English, but not necessarily in other languages.
In Inuktitut, spoken by the Inuit of Nunavut, their capital is IQALUIT ("many fish").
But the PM's office spelled it Iqualuit, which means "people with unwiped bums".

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 5:52 AM

Another proud Canadian moment

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 7:17 AM

I had not realized that Americans seriously thought the verb from of burglar was burglarize not burgle.
I think both are back-formations from the noun and equally valid but burglarize just sounds like incentivize or incentivizate...one of those words with an ending stuck on that just looks silly.

bigmama60
Bigmama60  (Level: 95.2 - Posts: 6648)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 7:28 AM

I was once a honcho

sandracam
Sandracam  (Level: 149.3 - Posts: 4190)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 7:57 AM

I once burgled a honcho
I like "smithereens"
And it's two words, but love "clipper ship"

surreyman
Surreyman  (Level: 260.9 - Posts: 2770)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 8:50 AM

In USese, is that a hairdresser's skills?

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 8:58 AM

Seems a close relationship, from fish to bums with one letter. Do they normally wipe their bums with fish?

papajensai
Papajensai  (Level: 193.3 - Posts: 1025)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 8:59 AM

Sausage.

Antelope.

Gorn.

Wonderfully woody words. Not tinny at all.




smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:01 AM

You've reminded me of a favorite: tintinnabulation.

papajensai
Papajensai  (Level: 193.3 - Posts: 1025)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:01 AM

"Do they normally wipe their bums with fish?"

Only when they're making lutefisk, Smokey.

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:08 AM

Ooooh, clipper ship! I'm going to have to figure out how to work that into my conversations more often! Perhaps I'll use it as my new pseudo-profanity

Aaaaaah, CLIPPER SHIP!!!

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:09 AM

Big hearty Prairie Home Companion belly laugh, Doc. Thanks!

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:33 AM

What a load of clipper ship!

Growing up in Baltimore you learn all about the clipper ships and the fortune built by the Patterson family with their speedy little vessels. Our high school teams were the Clippers, and our colors the blue and white of the bounding main.

The Patterson's had a wild, beautiful daughter named Betsy, who captivated and married Napoleon's handsome youngest brother, Jerome. Unfortunately, they did this without telling Napoleon, who when informed, took a very dim view and ordered Jerome back to France alone. As Betsy was now with child, Jerome took her with him, thinking the Emperor would yield if he met her and saw her condition. The pregnant Betsy was refused entry and turned from every port in the Empire by personal order of Napoleon, and finally took refuge in London. Jerome gave in to his brother and returned to France and married a princess and became a king for a little while.

Betsy was still a teenager when she was abandoned.

After the fall of Napoleon, Betsy and her son Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte returned to Europe as celebrities. The rest of her life was quite as adventurous as her youth. There are a couple of books about her.

Perhaps not interesting, but all true!

asor
Asor  (Level: 156.0 - Posts: 589)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:36 AM

Totally interesting!

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:43 AM

Donna, I see the makings for a fine film script. Quit diddling around on SD & get to work

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 3:59 PM

Too lazy. I'm poor, you see.

oldcougar
Oldcougar  (Level: 220.4 - Posts: 1935)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 4:03 PM



kaufman
Kaufman  (Level: 257.0 - Posts: 3936)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 6:11 PM

> Our high school teams were the Clippers

Too bad they had to move to Los Angeles.

bobolicios
Bobolicios  (Level: 118.4 - Posts: 1745)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 6:32 PM

Phenomenon and Eloquent. I love phenomenon because of the expectation it brings in really seeing something different. I love the word eloquent because it has origins in a bygone time when civilization was more concious of the verbage that came out of there mouth, compared with the way the english has disintegrated over the last century.

m48ortal
M48ortal  (Level: 251.4 - Posts: 3742)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:03 PM

Whachoo tawkin bout?!

garrybl
Garrybl  (Level: 280.2 - Posts: 6643)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:20 PM

most of the Greek rhetorical devices are not only fun names but fun ideas:

Synechdoche
Apotmesis
Chiasmus
Aposiopesis

Pronouncing them is half the battle!

By the way syncope is a fun name for non-funny event.

bobolicios
Bobolicios  (Level: 118.4 - Posts: 1745)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 9:33 PM

Smoke you are lazy and poor whoa next thing you know you will be in jail!

smoke
Smoke  (Level: 96.7 - Posts: 12009)
Mon, 31st Aug '09 10:24 PM

Or homeless. And it will serve me right for not taking more responsibility and working harder.


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