You are not signed in (Login or Join Free)   |   Help
Sploofus Trivia
Trivia GamesCommunityLeaderboardsTournaments
MySploofus
You are here:  Home  >>  Chat Forums  >>  The Salty Dog  >>  View Chat Message

View Chat Message



Pages:  1    


ladyvol
Ladyvol  (Level: 205.2 - Posts: 5486)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 10:21 AM

NEED SOME ADVICE FROM MY FRIENDS HERE

This has nothing to do with trivia quizzes or anything else I am looking for some advise. My youngest son is failing History and no matter what I or his teacher do for some reason he cannot (or will not) seem to get the subject. I am running out of ideas. Any help would be greatly appreciated.....Thanks in advance guys for your help.

geniuswaitress
Geniuswaitress  (Level: 52.1 - Posts: 381)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 10:31 AM

Try using the media or something that holds his attention and relates to the subject. If he's really reluctant, try to find movies that relate to the subject that is being studied. Or comics, or whatever might be his thing. How old is he?

redbaron
Redbaron  (Level: 198.1 - Posts: 296)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 10:37 AM

I didn't particularly enjoy history in school...until I ran into a class where history was taught through stories. One of my favorites followed a normal colonial person through their daily life as the American Revolution unfolded around them. It was full of historical facts and characters, but the fact that it was a drama and a story made it fun, especially since the main character in the story wasn't a historical figure, but rather just someone who was experiencing "history" as it happened.

I think history is easier to learn when it's brought alive that way, as opposed to being presented as a series of cold, hard facts and dates. Of course, there was still some dry memorization involved, but the stories helped motivate me to do it...

I never did that well in history, to be honest...But I passed that class and got through it.

Will

violetblue
Violetblue  (Level: 112.2 - Posts: 850)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 10:54 AM

Vickie I'm sorry your son is having trouble. I have an undergrad degree in American history (which I never use except for here). I always liked it but I think it's because I am rather sentimental and love old things (like furniture, houses, etc). I don't think anything in particular made me want to major in history besides that.

It would help to know how old your son is.

ladyvol
Ladyvol  (Level: 205.2 - Posts: 5486)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 11:18 AM

My son is 12....I've bought or rented movies about stuff they've been studying but so far he's shown very little interest...reading he doesn't care for very much either. never has...
He's too much like his daddy in that respect.
The only movie he liked about history was the old Disney series The Swamp Fox. And that is when they use to show it early of a morning before the bus ran on the Disney Channel...They don't show it anymore....
Vickie

joelwdonnal
Joelwdonnal  (Level: 117.9 - Posts: 268)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 12:04 PM

They is a company called Ohio Distinctive Software - they have inexpensive software that are "games" when actually they are learning while playing. You might want to try them. wwwhio-distintive-software. Maybe it will help.

Donna

flybybethy
Flybybethy  (Level: 136.6 - Posts: 155)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 12:08 PM

I've purchased stuff from Ohio Software before--they're pretty good and have a fairly large selection. The History Channel website may also have some ideas--I know they have an Educators' Idea Book available for teachers. Perhaps they have some suggestions on various media that would be helpful for certain topics.
Bethany

surreyman
Surreyman  (Level: 260.5 - Posts: 2770)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:09 PM

What's the significance of passing the History tests/exams, whatever within the USA? Or of failing?
In the UK it would be a deliberately chosen subject for examination between the ages of around 13-16. Before that it's just another subject amongst numerous all-round studies.
What I'm getting at is, if he has not deliberately chosen History for a specific and necessary exam pass, why bother? No point in stuffing an unliked subject down anyone's throat.
But if it's a symbol of similar studying difficulties over numerous subjects, then look at the 'studying' problem, not the 'subject' problem.
And I'm not doing down History - it was one of my two major subjects!

surreyman
Surreyman  (Level: 260.5 - Posts: 2770)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:10 PM

What's the significance of passing the History tests/exams, whatever within the USA? Or of failing?
In the UK it would be a deliberately chosen subject for examination between the ages of around 13-16. Before that it's just another subject amongst numerous all-round studies.
What I'm getting at is, if he has not deliberately chosen History for a specific and necessary exam pass, why bother? No point in stuffing an unliked subject down anyone's throat.
But if it's a symbol of similar studying difficulties over numerous subjects, then look at the 'studying' problem, not the 'subject' problem.
And I'm not doing down History - it was one of my two major subjects!

surreyman
Surreyman  (Level: 260.5 - Posts: 2770)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:11 PM

What's the significance of passing the History tests/exams, whatever within the USA? Or of failing?
In the UK it would be a deliberately chosen subject for examination between the ages of around 13-16. Before that it's just another subject amongst numerous all-round studies.
What I'm getting at is, if he has not deliberately chosen History for a specific and necessary exam pass, why bother? No point in stuffing an unliked subject down anyone's throat.
But if it's a symbol of similar studying difficulties over numerous subjects, then look at the 'studying' problem, not the 'subject' problem.
And I'm not doing down History - it was one of my two major subjects!

jenn326
Jenn326  (Level: 22.8 - Posts: 173)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:23 PM

Which portion of history? Is it US or Ancient Civ? If it is US, is there anyway to take him to some type of historical place? I know that after I saw the Lincoln Memorial and the Vietnam Memorial Wall, I didn't think US History was as boring as I once thought. And my mom is a US History teacher. She plays on here, so if you want to message her, I can give you her name and maybe she can help.
Hugs, and I'm sorry about your son. But you and the teacher are worried, and I'm sure you will be able to work together to come up with a great solution for your son.

siriusofazkaban
Siriusofazkaban  (Level: 15.1 - Posts: 196)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:34 PM

Sorry I cant be of much help. I hate history. I'm in college now and still taking a few genral ed requirements in the history area. It's positively boring and I dont understand how anyone can be so invested in the past when there's such an exciting future out there to concentrate on. This history teacher that I have right now is more than boring with his soporific lectures that go on for what seems like days. And we DONT learn anything in that class. Wow...this has turned into a rant. However, because history is a gen ed subject that he will be dealing with up into college, dont give up on helping him with it cause he will need it.
Have you considered hiring him a personal tutor? I have math problems, and even though math and history are very different subjects I find that when I work on math 1 on 1 with my husband (Who incidentally is a math tutor haha) that I understand it alot more. Perhaps your son would do better on a one on one basis with a tutor to help him with his history.
*ramble....ramble.....*
~Sirius

violetblue
Violetblue  (Level: 112.2 - Posts: 850)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:34 PM

Surreyman, American kids are required to take general coursework-- with electives, typically through graduation (12th grade). History is not usually (maybe never is) an elective.

siriusofazkaban
Siriusofazkaban  (Level: 15.1 - Posts: 196)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 1:36 PM

Yeah surrey I took history in one form or another all 12 years of my education because it was a requirement. And look....here I am 20 years old, in college, and SUPRISE! Still taking required history courses....and not retaining any of it. *Cringes at world events QOTD*
~Sirius

ladyvol
Ladyvol  (Level: 205.2 - Posts: 5486)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 4:22 PM

Thanks everyone espically for the website Donna it is appreciated. History is a required subject here and you have to have some basis in history before you graduate. what he is getting right now will help when he does start to high school as this will lay the ground work for the harder history courses he'll have to take in high school. Right now he is studying world history which will lead into
American history at least the Revolutionary War part anyway. Jenn tell your mom to message me when she gets a chance I'd love to have her input as she teaches History. I majored in History myself and loved it! If he should not make a passing grade he'll have to repeat the course in summer school before he can pass to the 8th grade. How else can one learn except by mistakes made in the past to stop someone from making those mistakes again? That's one reason I think History is so important. Sirius if you need any help with your college courses in History give me a shout ok? I thought those were easy! LOL......Thanks again everyone. I knew I could count on my friends here....

eksimba
Eksimba  (Level: 29.0 - Posts: 155)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 4:51 PM

Surreyman, as Carlos Santana once said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Or maybe it was "Oye como va." I forget. It was either him or George Santayana. Oh well, it's been so long since I took history in school.

machiabelly
Machiabelly  (Level: 136.2 - Posts: 190)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 5:05 PM

If he has a hobby...say baseball, try to find baseball related stories of the time.

mindmonkey
Mindmonkey  (Level: 270.4 - Posts: 295)
Tue, 8th Nov '05 5:54 PM

As a history teacher (bet you'd never have guessed that looking at my quizes), maybe I can give some suggestions. The first thing I would do is look at the teachers. You need enthusiasm to teach and lots of history teachers don't have that. They just drone on about things and dates that aren't relevant in any way. That leads to boredom and disinterest. Try, if you can, to get your kid into classrooms with enthusiastic teachers. That really makes a difference.

Next, I think the big question is, does he like to read. If he does, there are lots of things you can do. Machiabelly really has a good suggestion about sports. Basically every human activity has a history so if he likes baseball, you can stear him to baseball history books. If he likes fashion, there are histories of that which can spark interest.

Also, there are great novels that can get an interest going. For example, My Antonia by Willa Cather is all about pioneering families in the 1880s. If he's interested in that, he might try something similiar later. If he likes science fiction, there are a bunch of alternative history series out there. If he likes that, he might go find out the real history. The books don't have to be great literature. They just need to be fun to read.

The last thing is don't force him. If it's just grim work, there is less reason for him to like it. Instead, talk about history. When you are talking about current events, say things like, "it's just like....." so he sees that there are real connections. And there really are.

Today I was lecturing about The Senate's Nye Committee in the 1930s which reported that we got into World War I because the big corporations wanted to make big profits. Well, it was pretty easy to tell them that some people today (rightly or wrongly) are saying that we are in Iraq because of the big oil companies. That's how you make it relevant.

Hope this helps a little. Now back to the grind. Have humanities will travel, you know....

apatchee410
Apatchee410  (Level: 21.8 - Posts: 9)
Wed, 9th Nov '05 11:49 PM

why dont you just beat him.........

joelwdonnal
Joelwdonnal  (Level: 117.9 - Posts: 268)
Thu, 10th Nov '05 8:12 AM

Maybe hypnosis or brainwashing would work - it seems to have worked in Washington DC - lol

Donna

xanadutn
Xanadutn  (Level: 37.6 - Posts: 9)
Fri, 11th Nov '05 1:32 PM

it was never one of my best subjects, until college and i had a teacher that didn't believe in rote memorization, but rather concepts.

perhaps if there is a way to relate history back to what is happening in the world now it would help??????

terrbear424
Terrbear424  (Level: 98.3 - Posts: 35)
Tue, 15th Nov '05 1:53 AM

Some good ideas already posted; how about having your son help you create quizzes related to the topic of the week. I also have found timelines to be helpful-gives a more rounded approach to history as opposed to the often myopic approach; Pick something your son likes-cars, fishing, whatever and try to relate it to the history topic. Sometimes it takes an off the wall idea to spark an interest.


Pages:  1    



Copyright © 2003-2016 Sploofus Holdings LLC.  All rights reserved.
Legal Notice & Privacy Statement  |  Link to Sploofus